Interagency Agreement: Utah State Office of Education, Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Utah Head Start Association, Utah State Department of Health Baby Watch Early Intervention Program, United States Department of Health and Human Services, and Administration for Children and Families, Region VIII, XI, and XII
 

The following memorandum, signed in August 2000, provides a framework for collaborative service delivery for infants, toddlers, and young children with disabilities (ages 0 - 5) in Early Head Start and Head Start settings. It makes available to Head Start administrators and partners specific information about the areas of collaboration in Utah.





Definitions
Purpose
Authority
Goals
Components to Be Addressed in Local Agreements
     Child Find and Screening
     Child Find and Referral
     Evaluation
     Eligibility
     The Individual Family Service Plan
     The Individualized Education Plan
     Family Training
     Placement
     Transition at Age Three
     Transition to Kindergarten
     Shared Resources
     Confidentiality
Program Coordination for Children with Visual and/or Hearing Impairments
Interagency Dispute Resolution
Review and Dissemination
Agency Personnel Responsible for This Agreement
1999 Interagency Agreement Authorized Signatures

Definitions

BWEIP: Baby Watch Early Intervention Program
DSC: Head Start Disability Services Coordinator
EHS: Early Head Start; serves pregnant women and children birth to age three
FACT: Families, Agencies, Communities Together
Head Start: Head Start includes Early Head Start (serving pregnant women and children birth to age three), Migrant Head Start (serving children ages birth to five), and Head Start programs (serving children ages three to five), including regional and tribal Head Start programs
HSIEP: Head Start Individual Education Plan (developed if a child with special needs does not meet the state eligibility criteria for disabilities)
HSPPSSCD: Head Start Program Performance Standards Serving Children with Disabilities
IDEA: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act is the Federal law that addresses the needs of children with disabilities ages birth through twenty-one
IEP: Individual Education Program
IFSP: Individualized Family Service Plan
LEA: Local Education Agency
MHS: Migrant Head Start serves children of migrant farm workers ages birth to five
Part B: Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act addresses children with disabilities ages three through 21
Part C: Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act addresses children with disabilities under the age of three
SBE SER: State Board of Education Special Education Rules
UDOH: Utah Department of Health
USDB: Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind
USOE: Utah State Office of Education

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PURPOSE

The overall purpose of this agreement is to encourage and enhance the further development and implementation of Head Start (HS), Local Education Agency (LEA), Baby Watch Early Intervention Program (BWEIP) relationships in order to serve children ages birth through five with disabilities and their families, and to facilitate the development of local collaborative interagency agreements. The Utah State Office of Education (USOE), Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind (USDB), Utah Department of Health (UDOH), and the Utah Head Start Association including the Migrant Head Start program (MHS) and Tribal Head Start (THS) programs in Utah recognize the need to coordinate services systems and support and encourage the development of collaborative community-based systems of service delivery. This is based on the belief that coordinated and collaborative efforts among early childhood service providers will enhance the ability of individual agencies to meet the special education, early intervention, and related service needs of children and families while simultaneously increasing cost effectiveness, reducing duplication of services, and maximizing the utilization of existing resources.

Guidelines

Head Start programs are mandated in their Performance Standards to make every effort to work with local education agencies (LEAs) in developing interagency agreements to serve children with disabilities ages 3 to 5 (HSPPSSCD 1304.41 (a)(4) and 1308.4(l)).

To meet enrollment opportunities for children with disabilities, Early Head Start programs must either refer children to the Part C program for evaluation or accept only children with disabilities who are referred by a Part C (IDEA) Early Intervention program and have a documented Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) developed by a multidisciplinary team (HSPPSSCD 1304.20(f)(2)(i) and (ii)).

The law is clear, as are Head Start Performance Standards, that good working relationships be established between Head Start and its community partners in order that services to children with disabilities are enhanced and strengthened. To this end, this agreement seeks to facilitate good working relationships between Head Start, Early Head Start, Migrant Head Start, and Tribal Head Start programs and the many early childhood education agencies in Utah and to facilitate the development of collaborative local interagency agreements.

This agreement is intended to set the framework for cooperative endeavors between Head Start programs, LEAs (including USDB), and local early intervention providers in Utah. The specific areas of cooperation should be negotiated locally within the context of existing policies, and state and federal laws and regulations. The areas of cooperation should cover but not be limited to child find and counts, eligibility and classification activities, IFSP/IEP development and placement, shared use of related services, in-service training, transportation, and cooperative use of classrooms and physical facilities.

It is hoped that LEAs, BWEIPs, USDB, and HS programs will come to the table with services to children and families dominating their negotiation of their local agreements.

Local agreements may be initiated by local Head Start grantees, LEAs, BWEIPs, or USDB.

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Authority

This agreement is developed in accordance with Head Start Program Performance Standards on Services for Children with Disabilities (HSPPSSCD), which delineate the responsibilities of Head Start for the development and implementation of interagency agreements. In addition, it is developed under the general supervisory authority of the USOE, the USDB, and the UDOH BWEIP to make policy and set standards in the area of education for children with disabilities. (IDEA, Part C 34CFR 303.523)

Guidelines

This agreement has bee reviewed and signed by all parties to the agreement. See authorized signatures at the end of the agreement. All the applicable federal and state laws and regulations have influenced the writing of this agreement and the attendant efforts to form a comprehensive statewide agreement which serve young children with disabilities, ages birth to five, throughout the state of Utah.

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Goals

The goals of this agreement are to ensure the delivery of collaborative special education, early intervention, and related services to all eligible children and their families by:

Clarifying legislated responsibilities of state and LEAs, BWEIP, USDB and HS providers for service delivery to children ages birth to five with disabilities who reside in Utah;

Providing a framework for the development of local interagency agreements;

Ensuring the provision of technical assistance to local agencies and providers in their collaboration, refinement, and implementation of local interagency agreements;

Ensuring the provision of technical assistance to local agencies and providers in the implementation of collaborative services to children who have been identified or are suspected of having a disability and their families; and

Ensuring the mutual exchange of information on HS, USOE, UDOH, and USDB regulations regarding services to young children with disabilities.

Guidelines

The overarching goal of this agreement is to provide a definitive yet flexible statewide agreement, which can be used as a model for HS programs as well as LEAs, BWEIPs, and USDB as they develop agreements in their local service areas.

This agreement is based on the need for early childhood service providers to develop collaborative comprehensive systems of service delivery.  Coordinated and collaborative efforts among early childhood service providers will enhance individual agency’s abilities to meet the special education, family, and related service needs of children and families while simultaneously increasing cost effectiveness, reducing duplication of services, and maximizing the joint utilization of existing resources.

If questions or issues arise in the development of local interagency agreements, local service providers are invited to contact the appropriate agency listed at the end of this agreement.  Every effort will be made to accommodate and address the questions or issues through technical assistance.

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Components to Be Addressed in Local Agreements

Child Find and Screening: Each LEA, BWEIP, HS provider, and USDB, shall develop collaborative interagency procedures among their local agencies which ensure that all children residing within the jurisdiction of the district or catchment areas, who are suspected of having a disability, and who may be in need of early intervention or special education and related services, are located, identified, and evaluated in compliance with Federal and State laws and regulations (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.6 (a-c); SBESER; BWEIP State Plans; IDEA, Part B 34 CFR 300.125; IDEA, Part C 34 CFR 303.165).

Screening is the process used by Head Start and other programs to determine developmental level of all children including those suspected of having special needs.

Guidelines

Child Find and Screening:  Head Start Performance Standards and recruitment of children requirements dictate that a minimum of 10% of Head Start enrollment opportunities be available for children with disabilities (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1305.5). Head Start programs are encouraged to collaborate with LEAs and local BWEIPs to ensure that all low-income and Migrant Head Start eligible families residing in their catchment areas are aware of the comprehensive services available in Head Start programs and of the programming opportunities available to children with disabilities through HS, LEA, BWEIP and USDB. Collaborative activities could include:

  1. Public awareness
    1. Radio announcements
    2. Pamphlets in doctors’ offices
    3. Flyers in welfare check and other support efforts
    4. Newspaper ads
    5. Posters in offices of social service agencies
    6. Conferences with physicians, nurses, health providers, and child providers
    7. Notes sent home with children from school
    8. Flyers posted in supermarkets, post offices, hospitals, and other public places
    9. Parent-to-parent contacts
    10. PTA meetings
    11. School/HS newsletters
    12. Screening

It is suggested that collaborative screening take place between HS, LEAs, BWEIPs, and USDB.

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Child Find and Referral: Head Start must refer any child suspected of having a disability to the LEA or BWEIP for evaluation as soon as the need is evident. (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.6(e); Part C 34 CFR 303.165; Part B 300.125).

Guidelines

Child Find and Referral: Time is of the essence, especially when referring and providing services to children who have a disability. The “need is evident” when concerns about a child’s development are identified at any point by parents or by Head Start staff during screening or ongoing assessment. Head Start staff must refer the child, after obtaining parent permission, to the LEA as soon as possible or to the BWEIP within 2 days of identifying the concern.

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Evaluation: LEAs and BWEIPs will ensure understanding of parent rights under Federal and State laws. The permission to evaluate must be sought as soon as possible after the referral is received and in accordance with the timeline of BWEIP state plan and Part B state rules (SBE SER). On the basis of that review, teams identify what additional data if any, are needed   LEAs or BWEIPs are responsible for multidisciplinary eligibility evaluations for all children suspected of needing special education or early intervention services. The team, including a Head Start representative shall review existing evaluation data, including information provided by parents, current classroom-based assessments and observations.  Evaluations must be multidisciplinary, administered in the child's native language and not be racially or culturally discriminatory, use multiple instruments, and be administered by trained personnel at no cost to the parent

Head Start may provide or conduct the evaluation if the LEA does not, and if the evaluation is conducted by HS, it must be done in accordance with the provision of IDEA. If LEA refuses to conduct an evaluation of a child referred by HS, HS is requested to report this to the LEA Director of Special Education.

For a child being initially evaluated, the LEA has thirty (30) days from the date parental permission for evaluation is received to begin that process. The BWEIP has forty-five (45) days from the date of referral to complete evaluation, including the IFSP. (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.6 (e); Part C 34 CFR 303.166; Part B 34 CFR 300.532).

Guidelines

Evaluation:  Having referred as soon as the need is evident, multidisciplinary teams must meet to evaluate, determine eligibility and, if eligible, determine services and for children ages 3 to 5, and recommend placement. Parents must be a member of the team, as does the child’s regular education teacher. If Head Start is considered one of the placements, then the child’s regular education teacher would be the Head Start teacher.

Evaluation must be conducted in the child’s native language, which could be facilitated through the local interagency agreement citing the steps used in the evaluation process. Further, collaborative activities to assist in the referral and evaluation process may include:

  1. LEA and HS initiate a meeting with all 0-5 providers in their communities to share information about services.
  2. LEAs, BWEIP, USBD, and HS programs develop joint strategies for conducting assessment and exchange of assessment information.
  3. Utilize Central Registry, Central Resource directory, and Baby Your Baby programs.
  4. Work closely with community service providers (doctors, WIC, IDB, nurses, lay and professional clergy, preschool and social service workers).

Time of the Essence

The law specifically states the number of days for evaluation to take place and the initiation of services. LEAs, BWEIPs, USBD, and HS programs will strictly adhere to these timelines. By so doing, services to young children with disabilities will have maximum impact and provide support to families who may be struggling with issues in having a child with a disability.

Because farm workers and their families migrate in order to have employment, delays in providing an evaluation for a child who may have a disability may have the effect of depriving the child of services in accordance with HS Performance Standards. LEAs, BWEIPs and Migrant Head Starts are encouraged to collaborate to complete evaluations within 30 days of referral for children ages three to five, and within 45 days for children under the age of three.

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Eligibility: Eligibility determination must be made by a multidisciplinary team. The team must include parents, and if placement in HS is considered, representatives from HS. Meetings conducted for the purpose of determining eligibility should be attended by parents, persons knowledgeable about the child, and qualified professionals able to evaluate the data and interpret and communicate the meaning of test/evaluation results. The results of eligibility meetings must be documented by the LEA or BWEIP. Individual evaluations completed by each team member, including diagnostic protocols, shall be maintained in the child's confidential folder at either the LEA or BWEIP. All team members should be fully informed of the child's eligibility.  Children not eligible according to state Part B or Part C criteria may be classified and served under HS diagnostic criteria (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.7B1308.17; SBE SER HI.G. (pg. 35), III.H.5 (pg. 46); IDEA, Part C 34 CFR 303.166; IDEA, Part B 300.534).

Guidelines

Eligibility:  Qualified professionals are those, who by reason of training or knowledge of the child, can contribute to the evaluation of the child and the specific needs to be addressed via an IFSP or IEP.

Suggested collaborative activities include serving as members of the multidisciplinary team. The LEA and BWEIP have the primary responsibility for identifying and determining eligibility. Head Start staff can play a valuable role in supporting the identification and eligibility determination of children with disabilities.

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The Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP):  The IFSP must be written and the process completed within forty-five days of referral to the BWEIP.

The IFSP team must consist of the parent, a service coordinator, and at least one other professional who was involved in the evaluation and assessment process.  This person may be an early intervention or a Head Start representative.  An Early Head Start representative will participate as a member of the team and be responsible for representing services available through the Head Start program. This person may provide service coordination if appropriate.

The IFSP meeting is conducted in the family’s native language, or translator made available, or other mode of communication and result in a single service plan for the child.  It will identify developmental outcomes and the family’s needs related to the child and specify services by multiple agencies to meet those needs.  Al services will be provided in the child’s natural environment determined appropriate by the IFSP team, when considering the parent’s concerns and priorities.  A plan for transition, identifying the critical activities necessary to prepare the child and family for transition from the Part C to Part B, will be included for every child who is between the ages of two and three years old (HSPPSSCD 1304.20 (f)(2)(iii); Part C 34 CFR 303.167).

Guidelines

The Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP):  The process includes gathering of information and assessment (if not already available) in the areas of cognitive, adaptive, social-emotional, motor, and communication development. Additionally, a health assessment including vision and hearing screening, is to be completed. The family may voluntarily participate in a self-directed interview to help identify their concerns, priorities, and resources related to their child’s development.

If Early Head Start is to be an option of service provided through the IFSP process, then an EHS representative will participate as a team member. EHS programs are required to develop a Family Service Plan for all families. Programs are encouraged to combine the Family Service Plan and the IFSP into one document.

“Natural environments” are defined as those environments where the child is located including but not limited to home, childcare, hospitals, Early Head Start, or wherever the child or a typically developing child spends his/her time.

At least ninety days prior to the child’s third birthday and transitioning from Part C/Early Head Start to the next setting, a transition meeting will be initiated and involve persons knowledgeable about the child and parents (HSPPSSCD 1304.20(f)(2)(iii); IDEA, Part C 34 CFR 303.148).

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The Individualized Education Program (IEP): The IEP must be written within thirty (30) calendar days of the determination of the child's eligibility for special education and related services. Special education services cannot begin until the IEP is written. The IEP must be developed collaboratively during a meeting of the IEP team in accordance with state and federal regulations. A representative from HS should attend the IEP meeting for any child referred from and/or for whom HS may be an appropriate placement. The IEP team should collaboratively determine which special education and related services are the responsibility of and will be delivered by the HS program and which are the responsibility of and will be delivered by the LEA (34 CFR 300.344, 300.34)

HS may complete an evaluation and develop an HSIEP for the child eligible under HS diagnostic criteria for children ages 3 to 5 but not eligible by SBE SER criteria. The HSIEP must take into account the family strengths and circumstances, as well as the child's disability. It must also include family goals and objectives related to the disability when they are essential to the child's progress (check HS citation).

Guidelines

The Individualized Education Program (IEP): The development of the IEP serves as a management tool to enable the IEP team to fulfill their commitments in meeting the child’s educational needs. It must be written within 30 calendar days following the determination of the child’s eligibility for special education services. Note that special education services cannot begin until the IEP is written and finalized. However, Head Start may develop an interim plan in order to comply with the time line requirements of the Head Start Performance Standards.

If the child does not meet the eligibility criteria of the LEA, then HS can develop their own IEP following the guidelines in the HSPPSSCD. Head Start programs are discouraged from developing IEPs separate from the LEA because the IEP does not provide for free and appropriate public education (FAPE) and can become confusing to parents. Every effort should be made to work directly with the LEA in developing the IEP. Efforts can be directed to developing a 504 Accommodation Plan or other appropriate education plans.

When appropriate, representatives from the LEA, USBD, and HS should jointly develop, implement, review, and revise with parents, an IEP for children who meet state eligibility criteria. LEAs and HS programs are encouraged to share resources, e.g., materials, staff, transportation, facilities, training, and other resources necessary to implement the IEP.

LEA and HS programs are encouraged to consider the total needs of the child and family when program placement is chosen and related services provided, keeping in mind the health, family needs, and services necessary to implement educational and related IEP goals.

Other IEP issues include:

  1. IEPs must meet all State and Federal legal requirements.
  2. The receiving agency will develop an IEP with input from the sending agency at time of transition.
  3. Workshops are encouraged for parents to better understand the IEP process.
  4. Parental involvement is required in the identification, development, and implementation of IEP goals and objectives.

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Family Training: HS, LEAs, and BWEIPs are to provide appropriate parent training programs in accordance with the child's IEP/IFSP. Family services should be provided in the context of the community through collaboration of all service providers to avoid duplication of efforts and services (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.19 (a-k); IDEA, Part C 34 CFR 300.346; Part B 34 CFR 303.123).

Guidelines

Family Training:  Family services may include parent participation, parent-child interaction, social and emotional support of the child in the home and/or educational setting, and strategies for parent/professional exchange of information.

Head Start agencies are to provide parents with a program of activities to enhance the quality of life, the development of skills, and to facilitate their direct involvement as an advocate for the child with a disability.

The early childhood community is encouraged to share training programs and materials in order to meet the needs of families. LEAs, BWEIPs, and HS programs may choose to jointly sponsor parent training activities and are encouraged to do so.

Suggested joint training and/or support activities for parents and families of children with special needs include:

  1. Interactions with other parents in similar situations through family support groups.
  2. The provision of specific information regarding their child’s disability.
  3. Opportunities to meet with professionals in the areas of child development, behavior management, developmental disabilities, or whatever area of need has been identified.
  4. Training in ways to work with the child at home to foster positive growth and development.
  5. Opportunities to develop personal skills and support systems for themselves and their child.
  6. The development of skills needed to advocate for their child after leaving preschool programs.
  7. Opportunities to meet adults who have disabilities or special needs similar to those of their child.
  8. Utilize the services of the Utah Parent Center to develop relevant workshops for parents.
  9. Workshops sponsored by Head Start may be offered to all parents of district preschool children.
  10. Workshops sponsored by the LEAs and made available to parents of Head Start children.
  11. Joint case reviews for possible referral to other agencies for service not available through Head Start or the LEA.
  12. Parent group meetings to provide special training, professional input, hands-on experience.
  13. Home video tapes to be shared specific to various disabilities or on mourning/grieving process.
  14. Local Head Start staff may be contacted for translation, multicultural assistance, and support services for minority populations.

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Placement: The educational placement of each child with a disability shall be individually determined at least annually and be based on the child's IEP. Placement must be in the least restrictive environment in which the child's needs can be met. Provision must be made by the LEA for appropriate classroom or alternative settings necessary to implement a child's IEP and each district must provide a continuum of alternative placements, directly or through other arrangements, to meet the individual needs of each child. HS programs could be considered part of the LEAs options for placement. For children who are currently enrolled in HS, the HS setting should be considered the regular education placement for the child (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.5; IDEA).

Guidelines

Placement: The educational placement of each child with a disability shall be individually determined at least annually. Placement is in the child’s (ages 3-5) least restrictive environment as determined by the IEP team. Provisions must be made for appropriate classroom or alternative settings necessary to implement the child’s individualized education program.

Each LEA must provide a continuum of alternative placements to meet the individual needs of each child. Head Start can be one of the placement options. Other options described in the federal regulations are: regular classes, specialized classes, special schools, home instruction, instruction in hospitals and institutions. LEAs and community partners will also develop local placement options within their communities.

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Transition at Age Three: Transition planning for children entering preschool at age 3 must be conducted in accordance with State Interagency Transition Agreement, Local Interagency Transition Agreement, and Head Start Program Performance Standards on Services for Children with Disabilities. (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.54 (g)).

The Part C to Part B transition will be conducted in accordance with the State Interagency Agreement on Transition and any local agreements developed between Part C, Part B, and Head Start. The local agreements should address Head Start Program Performance Standards on Services for Children with Disabilities (HSPPSSCD 1308.21, 1304.41; IDEA, Part C 34 CFR 303.148; IDEA, Part B 34 CFR 300.131).

Guidelines

Transition at Age Three: A meeting, at least 90 days prior to the child’s third birthday, will be held to share information, identify possible services options, and to determine needed information for determining Part B eligibility. The 90-day transition meeting should be attended by the parents, services coordinator, Head Start representative, and other appropriate individuals. A meeting will be held prior to the child’s birthday to determine Part B eligibility, and to develop an IEP, if appropriate.

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Transition to Kindergarten: Head Start personnel should seek to work with LEAs Local Transition plans from preschool to kindergarten to ensure appropriate transition to kindergarten.

Guidelines

Transition to Kindergarten: No regulations govern transition to kindergarten. However, best practices would encourage the use of the State Transition Guidelines Preschool to Kindergarten Guidelines. For a current copy of these guidelines, contact the state preschool education specialist.

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Shared Resources: In an effort to reduce duplication, increase cost effectiveness, and improve the quality of services, programs must address strategies for the sharing of resources in the development of their agreements. These resources should include but are not limited to opportunities for joint in-service training of both staff and parents, technical assistance, materials and equipment, facilities, education and related service personnel, fiscal resources, and transportation (HSPPSSCD 45 CFR 1308.4 (a)(2), 1308.4 (j); IDEA).

Guidelines

Shared Resources: IEP/IFSP team participants determine the educational, developmental, assistive technology or other supportive services, including transportation, required to assist children with a disability so that they may benefit from their educational experience.

Suggested collaborative shared resource activities include:

  1. Placement of special education teacher in classroom at Head Start may be paid by district.
  2. Co-funding of transportation services for Head Start and LEAs.
  3. Effort to co-hire and fund direct and related services personnel (speech, language, OT, PT).
  4. Joint sponsorship of cooperative parent training in specific skill areas.
  5. Organizing transportation routes between agencies so as to avoid duplication of routes.
  6. Sharing between LEAs and Head Start multipurpose media/library resource centers.
  7. Assistance by LEAs and Head Start to parents for acquiring adaptive and augmentative equipment.
  8. Having the same professionals serve on assessment teams when possible.
  9. Increase emphasis on consideration of dual placement to meet the special education and related service needs of children and social integration needs.
  10. Individual consideration of assistive devices and augmentative systems rather than presumptive denial.
  11. Increasing Head Start’s access to Utah’s Augmentative/Alternative Communication Teams.

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Confidentiality: All information shared between agencies shall be consistent with SBE SER, HSPPSSCD, and BWEIP state guidelines, which describe confidentiality and due process rights.

Guidelines

Confidentiality:  Respect for children and family privacy is a matter of law and common practices. Release of information is always through written parent permission.

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Program Coordination for Children with Vision and/or Hearing Impairments

Vision and Hearing Impairments: For children with suspected or identified visual and/or hearing disabilities, representatives from the Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind (USDB) will be involved in the evaluation, eligibility determination, IEP/IFSP development, placement, service delivery, and transition for the child, according to state rules (SBE SER and BWEIP State guidelines).

Guidelines

Vision and Hearing Impairments: When a referral is received on a child who is suspected of having a sensory loss, Early Intervention, and USDB Parent Infant Program coordinate to share information about the child within two working days. Possible referral to Early Head Start will be coordinated with the local early intervention.

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Interagency Dispute
 Resolution

Interagency Dispute Resolution: Local agencies and providers are encouraged to proactively address differences at the local level, which could include using the Local Interagency Councils in their community. When all local options are unsuccessful, conflicts between LEAs, HS programs, and BWEIPS, should be documented and referred to the 619 Coordinator for the Utah State Office of Education, BWEIP Service Delivery Coordinator, and Region VIII, XI, and XII Disability Services Quality Improvement Centers (DSQICs) and if appropriate, personnel from USDB, to ensure timely proactive resolution. Disputes which can not be resolved by these individuals will be referred directly to personnel from Region VIII, XI, and XII Administration for Children and Families and the State of Utah Resolution Board.

State of Utah Resolution Board states the following procedure for dispute resolution:

Guidelines

Interagency Dispute Resolution:  Local resolution of disputes requires communication at all levels. Several regional and state personnel are available to provide technical assistance in resolving disputes. Head Start programs can request TA services from DSQIC, BWEIP programs from the state BWEIP/Part C program, and LEAs from the state 619 Coordinator. Only after thorough communication efforts have failed to resolve disputes, should higher levels of administration be sought.

Procedures for use of the dispute resolution board: 
Intra- and interagency disputes which cannot be resolved at the local level will be referred to a dispute resolution board composed of a member from the State Department of Health BWEIP, a member from the State Office of Education Special Education Services Unit, a member of the State Interagency Coordinating Council, a member of the Utah Special Education Advisory Panel (USEAP), and a director from the Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind or a member of the USDB Institutional Council.

Appeal from decisions of this board will be to the Department of Health, Division of Community and Family Health Services Director and the State Office of Education, Special Education Director, who will make a joint decision on the matter. For the purpose of this agreement, timely resolution shall be forty-five calendar days. BWEIP and Part B procedural safeguards apply for all children.

Procedures for state dispute resolution:
Intra- and interagency disputes that cannot be resolved through the Dispute Resolution Procedure will be referred to the Coordinating Council for Persons with Disabilities (CCPD). Appeal from decisions of this board will be to the Governor. For the purposes of this agreement, timely resolution shall be thirty calendar days.

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Review and Dissemination

This agreement will be in effect indefinitely unless superceded or annulled in writing by the agencies to this agreement, as signed on the signature page.  This agreement will be revised as necessary at the request of any party to the agreement with input from local providers, F.A.C.T., and LIC Chairs. The DSQICs will disseminate this agreement to all HS providers, the USOE will disseminate this agreement to all local school districts, and USDB, BWEIP will disseminate this agreement to all early intervention providers.

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Agency Personnel Responsible for This Agreement

The Section 619 Coordinator for the USOE, Part C Coordinator for BWEIP, Superintendent of USDB or designee, and personnel from Region VIII, XI, and XII DSQICs and Administration for Children and Families are responsible for the support and technical assistance required for the implementation of this agreement at the local level.

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1999 Interagency Agreement
Authorized Signatures

 

_____________________________________
Steven Laing
Superintendent of Public Instruction
Utah State Office of Education
250 East 500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
Phone: 801-538-7517    Fax: 801-538-7768

 

_____________________________________
Mae Taylor
Director of Special Education and At Risk Services (SARS)
Utah State Office of Education
250 East 500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
Phone:

 

 

 

_____________________________________
Lee Robinson
Superintendent Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind
742 Harrison Boulevard
Ogden, UT 84404
Phone: 801-629-4700

 

____________________________________
Bev Turnbo
Head Start Region VIII Administrator
1961 Stout Street, 9th Floor
Denver, CO 80294
Phone: 303-844-3100

 

_____________________________________
Helen Taylor
Director Head Start Region VIII Disability
Head Start Bureau
DHHS/ACYF/ACF
330 C Street SW
Washington, DC  20201

 

_____________________________________
Iran Rodriguez, Chief
Migrant Program Branch, Region XI
330 C Street SW
Switzer Building
Washington, DC 20201
Phone: 1-888-271-4590

 

_____________________________________
Rod Betit
Department of Health Executive Director
Utah Department of Health
288 North 1460 West
PO Box 141000
Salt Lake City, UT  84114-2802
Phone:  801-538-4401

 

 

_____________________________________
George Delevan, M.D.
Director, Community and Family Health Services
Utah Department of Health
288 North 1460 West
PO Box 142001
Salt Lake City, UT  84114-2802
Phone:  801-538-6901

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Interagency Agreement: Utah State Office of Education, Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Utah Head Start Association, Utah State Department of Health Baby Watch Early Intervention Program, United States Department of Health and Human Services, and Administration for Children and Families, Region VIII, XI, and XII. UTSOE, UTSDB, UTHSA, UTEIP, & HHS/ACF/ACYF/Region VIII, XI, and XII. 2000. English.




Last Reviewed: November 2009

Last Updated: April 20, 2012