Tribal Language Revitalization Report

The OHS reports information on efforts to revitalize tribal languages, which includes examples, teaching tips, and resources. The report affirms the value of maintaining Tribes' cultural and linguistic heritage.

At-a-Glance Comparison: Tribal Child Care and Development Fund and American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start

Tribes have requirements in their two-year Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) plans to coordinate the delivery of services with other tribal, federal, state, and local early childhood development programs, such as Head Start. This chart provides a quick glance that compares tribal child care with Head Start programs, and can be used by American Indian and Alaska Head Start programs to further their collaboration efforts.

Guide to Online Breastfeeding Resources

Currently, the Head Start Program Performance Standards require breastfeeding education for expectant families and accommodations for breastfeeding children. Breastfeeding provides a true head start for the children that Head Start programs serve. Research shows that breastfeeding has important long-term impacts on the health and development of children and the health and well-being of mothers. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and many other health organizations recommend that babies breastfeed exclusively for the first six months.

American Indian and Alaska Native Teacher Time Webinar Series

The American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) Teacher Time Webinar Series shares topics on effective teaching practices. The webinars feature in-service suites that can help teachers and home visitors better understand and identify effective teaching practices. Learn why they're important, what they look like in action, and how to use them in classrooms and during home visits. Each webinar offers practice-based strategies that teachers can use immediately to improve their practice.

Making It Work! Connecting Cultural Learning Experiences in American Indian and Alaska Native Classrooms and Communities with the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework

Adults have always taught children the skills and values that they need to succeed as adults in their culture. The Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework (ELOF) calls these the "domains of early learning." When early childhood programs connect their traditional cultural skills, values, beliefs, and life ways with the ELOF domains, children develop math, literacy, social-emotional, self-help, and other skills. The Making It Work! resource is a planning process that supports American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) Head Start programs to teach their language and culture while meeting Head Start requirements.

Incorporating Cultural Themes to Promote Preschoolers’ Critical Thinking in American Indian Head Start Classrooms

Connecting to cultural traditions enhances opportunities for parents to participate in their roles as their children’s primary teachers. Teaching teams, including parents and families may use this resource to understand how culturally relevant experiences help children develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. This resource offers steps to designing a culture-based inquiry unit that may be adapted to any community.

Breastfeeding Focus Areas: Diabetes and Obesity

Breastfeeding provides benefits to babies, mothers, and the community.  Staff and pregnant women in American Indian and Alaska Native communities may use this information to learn about the benefits of breastfeeding.

American Indian and Alaska Native Education Manager Webinar Series

Explore this American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) Education Manager Webinar Series, which presents topics on leadership development that are focused on supporting quality teaching and learning. Start watching to learn more about resiliency, individualized teaching, and using data.

Supporting Native Indian Preschoolers and Their Families

Community partners work effectively with preschools to design after-school events that incorporate storytelling and other Native Indian customs. These family-focused events are foundational to enhancing learning and building family resources to support the achievement of Native American children. This article presents effective strategies and the benefits that result from focusing on building family, school, and community relationships.