Multicultural Principles for Early Childhood Leaders

Head Start programs are effective when their systems and services support the cultural diversity of enrolled families. Furthermore, individual staff members must be able to demonstrate their respect for and respond to the different cultures in their community and among their co-workers. The following resource provides recent research and perspectives on key multicultural principles and offers guidance to staff on how to implement these principles in their programs.

Refugee Families

Find information on resettlement areas in the U.S. Resources on family well-being, health and safety, healthy brain development, early learning and school readiness, guidance and discipline, and family engagement in early care and education are also included in these materials. Programs serving refugee families, newly arrived immigrant families, and others may use these resources with parents to help ease their transition to a new country.Find information on resettlement areas in the U.S. Resources on family well-being, health and safety, healthy brain development, early learning and school readiness, guidance and discipline, and family engagement in early care and education are also included in these materials. Programs serving refugee families, newly arrived immigrant families, and others may use these resources with parents to help ease their transition to a new country.

Advancing School Readiness with the Office of Head Start's Multicultural Principles

Advancing School Readiness with the Office of Head Start's Multicultural Principles is a professional development tool designed to support programs in establishing culturally and linguistically competent systems and services. These resources guide staff in using culturally responsive practices when supporting children's progress toward school readiness.

Using "Tough Boris" to Promote Dialogic Reading Strategies

Children make great gains in literacy when they are engaged in conversation before, during, and after storytelling. This dialogic reading strategy is used to increase vocabulary and language development in young children. Teaching teams may use the Tough Boris example as a way to introduce dialogic reading.

Using Splat the Cat to Promote Dialogic Reading Strategies

Dialogic reading is an interactive way to talk with young children. It is a proven approach to increase vocabulary and language development for children learning to speak more than one language. Teaching teams can learn the strategy through this example of its use with "Splat the Cat" by Rob Scotton.

Dual Language Learners Toolkit

Administrators, practitioners, and families, who support young children learning their home languages and English, find helpful resources. These can help programs implement an intentional approach to language use.

Using Creative Problem Solving to Resolve a Conflict

Head Start staff must strive to build trust among themselves, remove and reduce barriers that interfere with working together, and learn to dialogue in constructive ways. This resource can be used by all staff. This article provides six creative problem-solving steps to resolve a conflict. By using these steps, Head Start staff will have a positive effect on Head Start parents and children and the lives of those touched by these parents and children. Examples are given to illustrate situations where conflict is likely to happen.