PFCE Framework Webinar Series

With goals and a plan of action in place, the next challenge is to identify ways to measure children’s progress toward meeting goals. Child-level assessment data is collected for individual children by programs using one or more valid and reliable assessment systems. Tools for determining a child’s status and progress include, but are not limited to, direct assessment, structured observations, checklists, staff or parent report measures, and portfolio records or work samples.

Healthy Children Are Ready to Learn

Health connects to school readiness long before a child enters school. Healthy development continues to support learning throughout childhood and later life. "Health in the earliest years—actually beginning with the future mother's health before she becomes pregnant—lays the groundwork for a lifetime of well-being…"

Family Health Literacy

Family Health Literacy

Family Health Literacy Services and Their Link to School Readiness

ELOF2GO Mobile App

Learn more about the Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework (ELOF) anywhere you go, by downloading this useful mobile app designed for teachers.

Infant and Toddler Caregivers

For infants and toddlers, school readiness refers to their developing capacity to self-regulate, demonstrate curiosity, communicate effectively, and develop close, secure relationships. Good health and proper nutrition support this developing capacity. This happens within the context of nurturing, culturally responsive relationships with parents, caregivers, extended family, and community.

Making the Link Between Health and School Readiness

Program leaders can use this online tool to design school readiness goals that integrate meaningful health strategies. Program leaders can also use it to identify the link between their school readiness goals and health service plans. Health promotion, prevention, and access to treatment can help achieve those goals.

Leader's Role in School Readiness

Every Head Start and Early Head Start program is required to develop a plan of action to meet desired outcomes of school readiness, family engagement, professional development), curriculum, assessment, and teaching practice. A key part of this plan is to make sure teachers, home visitors, and family child care providers intentionally support children’s progress. For this to happen, systems and services must come together as early as possible.