Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework

The new framework is designed to show the continuum of learning of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. It is grounded in comprehensive research around what young children should know and be able to do during their early years.

Advancing School Readiness with the Office of Head Start's Multicultural Principles

Advancing School Readiness with the Office of Head Start's Multicultural Principles is a professional development tool designed to support programs in establishing culturally and linguistically competent systems and services. These resources guide staff in using culturally responsive practices when supporting children's progress toward school readiness.

DEC Position Statement on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness

For young learners of English who are speakers of other languages (ESOL), the challenges of literacy and language development are different if they are learning in an all-English environment where they need the language to function in school, or if they are in an environment where English is taught as a foreign language (EFL) in school. This position paper from the Division of Early Childhood focuses on children who speak a language other than English at home, and who are entering school environments where English is the principal medium of instruction.

ECLKC Professional Development Modules

The Head Start ECLKC Professional Development Modules are designed for individual or group professional development activities to help Head Start programs meet the needs of children who are dual language learners and their families.

Shared Responsibilities: Helping Managers Understand

The purpose of this workshop activity is to engage participants personally and help them understand how managers' decisions affect the day-to-day experiences of children with disabilities and their families.

Cultural Backgrounders on Various Refugee and Cultural Groups New to the United States

This series of resources provide general cultural information on various refugee and cultural groups new to the United States. It is always best to get to know each family and learn their individual characteristics, as every family is unique and cultural practices vary by household and by generation. These resources provide basic information to help staff begin discussions with families and communities.