Immunization Schedules

Find current immunization schedules (from the CDC) for children ages birth through 6 years old, catch-up schedules for children birth to 18 years old and the adult schedule by vaccine and age group.

Infectious Diseases: Prevention and Management

Preventing and managing communicable disease in early childhood programs can reduce the rate of illnesses. Learn strategies for controlling the spread of germs and protecting children and adults from getting sick.

Infants and Vaccines: Answering Parents’ Questions

Vaccines, also called immunizations, are a safe and effective way to protect children from many common diseases. If parents delay or avoid child vaccinations, they can put their child and others at risk for potentially dangerous diseases.

Mumps Vaccine: Preventable Diseases Infographic

Check out the infographic below to learn why the best way to protect against mumps is to get the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Doctors recommend that all children get the MMR vaccine to be protected from these three potentially serious diseases.

Immunization of Caregivers/Teachers

Caregivers/teachers should be current with all immunizations routinely recommended for adults by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as shown in the “Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule” in the following categories...

Immunization Documentation

Programs should require that all parents/guardians of enrolled children provide written documentation of receipt of immunizations appropriate for each child's age. Infants, children, and adolescents should be immunized as specified in the “Recommended Immunization Schedules for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years,” developed by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the CDC, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. Children whose immunizations are not up-to-date or have not been administered according to the recommended schedule should receive the required immunizations, unless contraindicated or for legal exemptions.

Unimmunized Children

If immunizations have not been or are not to be administered because of a medical condition, a statement from the child's primary health care provider documenting the reason why the child is temporarily or permanently medically exempt from the immunization requirements should be on file. If immunizations are not to be administered because of the parents'/guardians' religious or philosophical beliefs, a legal exemption with notarization, waiver, or other state-specific required documentation signed by the parent/guardian should be on file. Parents/guardians of an enrolling or enrolled infant who has not been immunized due to the child’s age should be informed if/when there are children in care who have not had routine immunizations due to exemption.