Birth To 5: Watch Me Thrive! A Compendium of Screening Measures for Young Children

Recent statistics indicate that as many as 1 in 4 children, ages 0-5, are at moderate or high risk for developmental, behavioral, or social delay. As a result, the Administration for Children and Families, Administration for Community Living, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare, Health Resources and Services Administration, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at the Department of Health and Human Services as well as the Office of Special Education Programs at the Department of Education have partnered to launch Birth to Five: Watch Me Thrive!, a coordinated effort to encourage developmental and behavioral screening and support for children, families, and the providers who care for them.

Access to Health Insurance

Explore helpful resources about health insurance and the Health Care Marketplace for programs and families.

Oral Health Forms

Use these forms to document dental home information and current oral health status and services; such as diagnostic and preventive services, counseling, restorative and emergency care, and referral to a specialist.

Cribs and Play Yards

Before purchase and use, cribs and play yards should comply with current CPSC and ASTM International safety standards. Programs should only use cribs for sleep purposes and ensure that each crib is a safe sleep environment as defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Use of Tobacco, Alcohol, and Illegal Drugs

Directors, caregivers, volunteers, and staff should not be impaired due to the use of alcohol, illegal drugs or prescription medication during program hours. Tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drug use should be prohibited on the premises (both indoor and outdoor environments) and in any vehicles used by the program at all times. In family child care settings, tobacco and alcohol should be inaccessible to children.

10 Actions to Create a Culture of Safety

Head Start program managers, staff, and families keep children safe by creating a culture of safety. Everyone contributes to an environment that allows people to speak up about safety concerns. They also make it all right to talk about mistakes and errors, and encourage learning from these events. Children are safer when everyone works together to improve the strategies they use in homes, centers, and the community.  Note: This resource is under review.