Create a Culture of Safety

In programs, all managers, staff, and families embrace the belief that children have the right to be safe by creating a culture of safety. They provide "an environment that encourages people to speak up about safety concerns, makes it safe to talk about mistakes and errors, and encourages learning from these events." Children are safer when managers, staff, and families work together to improve the strategies they use in homes, centers, and the community so children don't get hurt. Explore the resources below to learn more about creating a culture of safety.

Head Start Pre-K Local Partnerships That Work: Tulsa, Oklahoma

Learn how the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP) combined the philosophy of traditional Head Start with collaborative partnerships from area school districts to transform a program on the brink of collapse into a highly regarded early childhood program. 

Documenting In-Kind Contributions

Documenting in-kind contributions is a key part of a grantee’s fiscal operations. By accurately documenting in-kind expenditures, your program has a record of its financial "sweat equity" for potential funders.

Real Property Status Report (SF-429)

As described in ACF-IM-HS-15-01 Real Property Reporting and Request Requirements, all grantees, including those with no covered real property, are instructed to use and submit standard form (SF) Real Property Status Repoty 429. It includes the following real property reporting and request forms: Note: These resources are under review.

Submission of Tangible Personal Property Report (SF-428)

ACF-PI-HS-17-04 notifies grantees of the requirements around SF-428 and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Payment Management System (PMS). Grantees are required to provide Tangible Personal Property Report SF-428 and SF-428B, and SF-428S if needed, not later than 90 days after the close of the project period.

Active Supervision

All Head Start educators are responsible for making sure that no child is left unsupervised. Active supervision is a strategy that works. It can be used in classrooms, family child care, playgrounds, and buses. It can also be shared with families as a tool to use at home. This fact sheet explains what active supervision is and how to use it in your program.

Even Plants Can Be Poisonous

Plants are important to our health and well-being, and they can help children understand and respect the natural world. However, some plants and seeds can be harmful when eaten or touched. According to Caring for Our Children Standard 5.2.9.10: Prohibition of Poisonous Plants, poisonous or potentially harmful plants are not allowed in any part of a child care facility. If Head Start management or staff are unsure whether a plant is toxic, they can work with the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) to identify it and determine whether it is safe. Review the list of common household plants to learn which are poisonous. Staff also can share the list with families so they can protect their children and pets from toxic plants at home.

Documentation-Volunteers Services

Grantees and delegate agencies will find this resource useful when documenting volunteer services. An agency's volunteer services should be documented similarly as for its employees, including time and attendance records or activity sheets.

Head Start Staff Qualifications

Head Start programs must ensure all staff, consultants, and contractors have sufficient knowledge, training, experience, and competencies to fulfill the roles and duties of their position. FInd the resources to understand these requirements.