Curriculum

The curriculum promotes positive home visitor-family relationships and interactions. A home visitor's positive relationship with parents and families through culturally and linguistically responsive interactions forms the foundation of home visits. A strengths-based approach to building relationships with families provides a foundation for home visitors to interact with families. The curriculum provides strategies for how home visitors can establish positive relationships and responsive interactions with parents and families. The curriculum also provides strategies to bring families together in groups to facilitate peer support.

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  • Three star rating graphic Moderate Evidence
  • Two star rating graphic Minimal Evidence
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Curriculum

Rating

Review

Growing Great Kids™ for Preschoolers

Full Review & Ratings
Three star rating graphicModerate Evidence

Relationships with Parents and Families: The curriculum offers specific guidance for building positive relationships with families that is integrated throughout the curriculum materials and structure of home visits. Each home visit starts with "Making Connections," a dedicated time for home visitors and families to talk through what the family is experiencing, as well as to recognize the efforts of families. The "Conversation Guides" provide home visitors with conversation scripts that could support home visitors' relationships with families (e.g., "This is a partnership, so I will be listening closely to what is going on with you and your child and where you want to go next in the curriculum."). The materials offer a strengths-based approach for home visitors to use with families (e.g., a focus on "accentuating the positives"). Moreover, "Home Time," the last part of home visits, is a time for home visitors to check in with families about using concepts and activities during the week.

Responsive Interactions with Parents and Families: The curriculum provides some information for home visitors on how to be responsive to families (e.g., using a strengths-based approach with families, collaborating to develop IFSPs). However, the "Conversation Guides," which are the foundation of the home visits, give scripted questions and responses for home visitors to use with families. In a description of the "Conversation Guides" during the first visit with families, the home visitor script reads, "You will notice that I am going to be reading from this manual. That is because it includes 'Conversation Guides' for our visits." The scripted nature of the guides leaves little room for home visitors to adaptively respond to families. Additionally, while families can ask which module to progress to next, little guidance is provided to modify activities based on the family's interests, strengths, or needs.

Peer Support: Growing Great Kids for Preschoolers includes a few short sections that discuss the importance of social support for families (e.g., "Growing Your Support Network... Strengthening Protective Buffers" in Growing Great Families). However, no explicit guidance is offered on how home visitors can bring families together for group socializations.

Growing Great Kids™: Prenatal–36 Months

Full Review & Ratings
Three star rating graphicModerate Evidence

Relationships with Parents and Families: Growing Great Kids™ offers specific guidance for building positive relationships with families that is integrated throughout the curriculum materials and structure of home visits. Each home visit starts with "Making Connections," a dedicated time for home visitors and families to talk through what the family is experiencing, as well as to recognize the efforts of families. The "Conversation Guides" provide home visitors with conversation scripts that could support home visitors' relationships with families (e.g., "This is a partnership, so I will be listening closely to what is going on with you and your child and where you want to go next in the curriculum."). The materials offer a strengths-based approach for home visitors to use with families (e.g., a focus on "accentuating the positives"). Moreover, "Home Time," the last part of home visits, is a time for home visitors to check in with families about taking concepts and activities into the week.

Responsive Interactions with Parents and Families: The curriculum provides some information for home visitors on how to be responsive to families (e.g., using a strengths-based approach with families, collaborating to develop "Individualized Family Support Plans"). It also provides a tool for family self-assessment ("GGK Tool"). However, it is not clear how the tool is used to support collaborative planning. Additionally, the "Conversation Guides," which are the foundation of all curriculum manuals, give scripted questions and responses for home visitors to use with families. In a description of the "Conversation Guides" during the first visit with families, the home visitor script reads, "You will notice that I am going to be reading from this manual. That is because it includes ‘Conversation Guides' for our visits." The scripted nature of the guides leaves little room for home visitors to adaptively respond to families. Additionally, while families can ask which module to progress to next, little guidance is provided to modify activities based on the family's interests, strengths, or needs.

Peer Support: Growing Great Kids: Prenatal–36 Months includes a few short sections that discuss the importance of social support for families (e.g., "Growing Your Support Network ... Strengthening Protective Buffers" in Growing Great Families). However, no explicit guidance is offered on how home visitors can gather families together for group socializations within this curriculum. The publisher offers a separate curriculum, Growing Great Socializations, that programs can purchase to support group socializations.

Parents as Teachers Foundational Curriculum: Prenatal to 3

Full Review & Ratings
Four star rating graphicFull Evidence

Relationships with Parents and Families: Parents as Teachers offers specific guidance, integrated throughout the curriculum materials, on how to build positive relationships with families. For example, "The Parent Educator's Role in the Personal Visit" provides specific strategies for how home visitors can build and sustain positive relationships with families. It describes three roles for home visitors: partners, facilitators, and reflectors. "When utilizing these first two roles, parent educators create time, space, and a safe atmosphere in which families are able to wonder and consider. As reflectors, parent educators use evidence-based practices to prompt reflections and generate awareness." In addition, the curriculum provides a variety of materials for both home visitors and families on how to support the home visitor-family relationship (e.g., "Welcome to Parents as Teachers," "The Strengthening Families Approach").

Responsive Interactions with Parents and Families: The curriculum provides specific guidance on how to engage in responsive interactions with diverse families. "Facilitating," a section of "The Parent Educator's Role in the Personal Visit," describes strategies for supporting responsive interactions with families (e.g., "Observing, listening and learning," "Gaining parents' perspectives," "Responsiveness and flexibility"). In addition, each home visit begins with "Connect, Reflect, and Agree," which provides time for home visitors and families to spend time getting to know one another, reflecting on what has been happening with the child, and agree on what will happen during the visit.

Peer Support: The curriculum offers specific guidance for how to bring families together to facilitate peer support through "Group Connections," a series of resources on group socializations. "Group Connections" provides a planning guide for group socializations, as well as suggestions for partnering with families to plan events.

Partners for a Healthy Baby

Full Review & Ratings
Two star rating graphicMinimal Evidence

Relationships with Parents and Families: The curriculum provides general guidance on building relationships with families. The "User's Guide" includes a brief section called "How Do I Build a Trusting Relationship?" with some general tips for building a trusting relationship with families (e.g., "keep their confidences," "respect their culture and values"). The "User's Guide" states, "To fulfill your role, you must first be able to establish warm, supportive, and empowering relationships with families whose culture, beliefs, values, and priorities may not be the same as your own. Establishing a good relationship with each family is key to your effectiveness." However, the curriculum does not offer specific guidance for supporting a relationship-building process between home visitors and families that is integrated throughout the curriculum materials. 

Responsive Interactions with Parents and Families: The "User's Guide" briefly describes the importance of responding to a family's concerns during a home visit. It provides some general tips and reflection questions to promote responsive interactions with families (e.g., "Inquire about any immediate needs or concerns," "Address the family's concern first," "Did I attend to what the family was telling me with their words and non-verbal cues?"). In addition, the "Detailed Information Pages" provide open-ended questions home visitors can use with the family to start conversations. However, there is little room in the "Detailed Information Pages" for home visitors to actively respond to families' unique needs, and the home visit planning process does not involve families. Additionally, little consideration is given to how home visitors engage in responsive interactions with diverse families. 

Peer Support: Partners for a Healthy Baby includes several parent handouts and "Detailed Information Pages" that discuss the importance of social support for families (e.g., "Circle of Support for My Baby and Me"). However, no explicit guidance is provided on how home visitors can gather families together for group socializations.