Curriculum

The curriculum provides guidance on how to support parents and families in making the home a rich learning environment and in establishing developmentally appropriate routines. A nurturing home learning environment offers developmentally appropriate schedules, routines, and indoor and outdoor opportunities for play, exploration, and experimentation. The home learning environment should include age-appropriate materials and supplies. The curriculum should support the selection of developmentally appropriate learning materials from the home and culture that foster children's open-ended exploration and inquiry.

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  • Three star rating graphic Moderate Evidence
  • Two star rating graphic Minimal Evidence
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Curriculum

Rating

Review

Growing Great Kids™ for Preschoolers

Full Review & Ratings
Three star rating graphicModerate Evidence

Environment: Growing Great Kids™ for Preschoolers offers minimal guidance on the use of the home as a learning environment to support children's development. Growing Great Families and the curriculum manual mention the importance of safety in the home and space for children to move around. However, limited guidance is provided on creating a home learning environment that supports children's exploration and play. Additionally, no specific guidance is given on how to make a home learning environment accessible for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.

Learning Materials: Growing Great Kids for Preschoolers provides limited guidance on using learning materials that can be found in the home to foster children's exploration and inquiry. While the curriculum describes some "common household items" that can be used in the activities, many of the materials required for the Learning Pods are brought into the home by the home visitor. The Learning Pods suggest that home visitors bring a "Home Visitor Learning Pod Supply Kit" that contains "arts and crafts parents may not have in their homes." Additionally, no specific guidance is offered on how to incorporate learning materials that are accessible for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need to ensure participation in play and other activities.

Routines: The curriculum provides specific guidance on how to establish and support developmentally appropriate routines. Growing Great Families emphasizes how routines (e.g., bath time, mealtime, bedtime) provide natural contexts for children's learning and development (e.g., self-regulation, independence, fine motor skills). In addition, a few activities in the Learning Pods provide guidance on supporting routines (e.g., "Evening Routines," "Eating Healthy Foods," "About Health and Nutrition").

Growing Great Kids™: Prenatal–36 Months

Full Review & Ratings
Three star rating graphicModerate Evidence

Environment: The curriculum emphasizes use of the home as a learning environment to support children's development. Throughout the curriculum, the activities provide specific guidance for using space in the home to support exploration and development (e.g., "messy play at home for learning through touch," arranging furniture to support exploration, activities on assessing safety in the home). A limitation is that no specific guidance is provided about making a home learning environment accessible for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.

Learning Materials: The curriculum provides specific guidance embedded throughout curriculum materials on using learning materials from the home. The learning activities in each of the manuals emphasize finding and using materials that can be found in the home to support open-ended exploration (e.g., plastic bowls, metal spoons). For example, one activity proposes that families and home visitors find "three objects that have different textures, colors, and shapes" for the child to touch or mouth. However, no specific guidance is offered on how to incorporate learning materials in play that are accessible for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.

Routines: Growing Great Kids: Prenatal–36 Months provides specific guidance on how to establish and support developmentally appropriate routines that are responsive to a child's needs. Guidance on routines is embedded throughout the activities, "Daily Do's" (handouts parents can use every day), and Growing Great Families materials, emphasizing how routines (e.g., bath time, mealtime, bedtime) provide natural contexts for children's learning and development (e.g., self-regulation, independence, fine motor skills).

Parents as Teachers Foundational Curriculum: Prenatal to 3

Full Review & Ratings
Three star rating graphicModerate Evidence

Environment: In several resources for home visitors and families (e.g., "Space and Structure for Your Little Explorer," "Designing and Guiding as Your Child Grows," "Safe and Healthy Home Environments"), Parents as Teachers provides specific guidance for how to set up a home environment that supports exploration and development. However, the curriculum offers limited guidance on how to make the home environment accessible for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.

Learning Materials: Parents as Teachers includes many resources with specific guidance on using developmentally appropriate learning materials found in the home to foster open-ended exploration and inquiry. For example, "Making the Most of Toys" describes how open-ended materials that are often found in the home offer opportunities for different kinds of exploration that support children's learning. The curriculum provides limited guidance on how to incorporate learning materials that are accessible to children with disabilities, suspected delays, or other special needs.

Routines: Parents as Teachers provides a variety of resources throughout the curriculum with specific guidance on how to support early routines that are responsive to children and foster learning (e.g., "Your Baby's Sleep Routines," "Reasons to Read to Your Baby"). The section "Recognizing, Creating, and Adapting Routines" describes the importance of and strategies for creating individualized routines for children (e.g., considering a baby's temperament before implementing a routine) and offers tips for collaborating with parents around routines.

Partners for a Healthy Baby

Full Review & Ratings
Three star rating graphicModerate Evidence

Environment: The curriculum includes some general guidance on supporting the home as a learning environment. The focus of much of the guidance relates to safety in the home; for example, "Equipment Safety Tips" provides tips for organizing a home and making sure items are safe for infants. It also includes some general guidance on organizing the home learning environment to support exploration and play (e.g., "Arrange your Home for Success"). It does not include guidance on making a home learning environment accessible for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. 

Learning Materials: The curriculum provides some specific guidance, particularly in parent handouts, on using developmentally appropriate learning materials found in the home. A few handouts (e.g., "Smart Toys from Your Kitchen," "Homemade Toys to Help Me Learn") include suggested materials families can gather from the kitchen or from other areas of the home (e.g., cooking spoons, pots, boxes) for children to use in play. The curriculum includes some guidance on how to use the materials to foster open-ended exploration and inquiry (e.g., building, creating, problem-solving). However, it does not provide guidance on how to incorporate materials that are accessible for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.

Routines: Partners for a Healthy Baby consistently guides families in establishing and supporting developmentally appropriate routines that are responsive to a child's needs. The curriculum includes specific guidance on routines that is embedded throughout the "Detailed Information Pages" for home visitors and the parent handouts, particularly in the "Caring for Baby" section. It also includes materials to support routines that are responsive to a child's needs at mealtimes, bedtime, during transitions, and at other points in the day.