Currículo

Criterio 13

Individualización para niños con discapacidades, sospecha de retrasos u otras necesidades especiales

El currículo proporciona orientación sobre cómo ayudar a los padres y las familias a apoyar a su hijo con una discapacidad, sospecha de retraso u otra necesidad especial. Los visitadores del hogar y las familias pueden adaptar las experiencias de aprendizaje del currículo para un niño con una discapacidad u otra necesidad especial. El currículo incluye sugerencias de adaptaciones para el entorno físico de aprendizaje en el hogar y adaptaciones de experiencias de aprendizaje en el currículo para satisfacer las necesidades de aprendizaje y las fortalezas de los niños con discapacidades, sospechas de retrasos u otras necesidades especiales. El currículo también proporciona sugerencias sobre cómo los visitadores del hogar pueden proporcionar recursos y referencias a las familias según sea necesario.

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  • Three star rating graphic Evidencia moderada
  • Two star rating graphic Evidencia mínima
  • One star rating graphic Sin evidencia

Currículo

Valoración

Review

Partners for a Healthy Baby

Full Review & Ratings
One star rating graphicSin evidencia

Resources and Referrals: The "Watch Me Grow!" handouts throughout the curriculum provide brief information on the importance of referring families with a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need to resources in the community (e.g., "Be prepared to share information about Part C services with the family."). The curriculum offers minimal guidance on how to identify resources in the community or how to go through a referral process. 

Learning Environment: The curriculum does not address the accessibility of the home environment or learning materials for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. 

Parenting Practices and Interventions: The curriculum does not address adaptations to routines or learning experiences for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.

Two star rating graphicEvidencia mínima

Resources and Referrals: The curriculum's approach promotes building a system of support and the delivery of appropriate services. Baby TALK emphasizes the importance of providing resources and referring families to resources in the community. Guidance is included to discuss the potential need for referrals at each home visit (e.g., the Referrals Document keeps track of all referrals made by the home visitor to the parents; the Personal Encounter Documentation form includes the question of whether a referral is needed). However, the curriculum does not provide specific guidance for home visitors on how to identify resources or how to support families in referrals relevant to children with disabilities, suspected delays, or other special needs. For example, the Developmental Perspectives for 12-month-olds recommends sharing developmental concerns with the pediatrician, and the pediatrician will "keep an eye on the concern to make sure it is addressed as quickly as possible." No further information is provided on specific services for children identified with a developmental delay (e.g., Early Intervention services under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)).

Learning Environment: The curriculum does not include clear suggestions for parents and families about how to set up an appropriate environment and materials to support the development and learning of their child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.

Parenting Practices and Interventions: The curriculum provides limited guidance on how home visitors and families can adapt learning experiences for a child with a disability or other special need. For example, in the Let's Talk Kids column, Special Kids, Regular Lives, families and home visitors are reminded that children with special needs are children first. Additionally, another column, When Kids Know Best, briefly mentions the issue of sensory overstimulation and the importance of supporting the child to avoid difficulty with concentration, stress and anxiety, and other significant challenges. Baby TALK lacks more specific strategies related to parenting practices and interventions to support children with special needs.

Parents as Teachers Foundational Curriculum: Prenatal to 3

Full Review & Ratings
Three star rating graphicEvidencia moderada

Resources and Referrals: Parents as Teachers provides specific guidance on referring families with a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need to resources in the community. "Difference and Delays in Development" describes the referral process in detail (e.g., gathering observations, screening, referring a child to a health care provider or early intervention system, eligibility for services determined by a "multi-transdisciplinary team"). It also discusses the importance of collaborating with other early intervention professionals if a child has an identified disability.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides limited guidance on ensuring that the home environment and learning materials are accessible to children with disabilities, suspected delays, or other special needs. "The Benefits of Activity Pages" briefly mentions the importance of appropriate materials for a child with a disability, but no guidance is provided on adapting the home learning environment within this curriculum. The publisher offers a separate curriculum, Interactions Across Abilities: Supporting Families of Children with Special Needs, with more guidance on individualization for children with disabilities, suspected delays, or other special needs.

Parenting Practices and Interventions: Parents as Teachers offers general guidance on how to adapt the curriculum's learning experiences for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. "Supporting Learning in the Early Years" includes a section called "Adapting Activities" that provides strategies for how families can adapt activities to a child's developmental level (e.g., "parents might demonstrate different ways to do a new skill, offer other materials, or guide their child's hand or body so she feels successful"). However, many of the activities in the curriculum do not include specific adaptations for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. The publisher offers a separate curriculum, Interactions Across Abilities: Supporting Families of Children with Special Needs, with more guidance on individualization for children with disabilities, suspected delays, or other special needs.

Growing Great Kids™ for Preschoolers

Full Review & Ratings
Two star rating graphicEvidencia mínima

Resources and Referrals: The curriculum offers minimal guidance for home visitors to connect families of a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need to resources in the community. Growing Great Families mentions the importance of connecting families with resources in the community, if needed (e.g., Advice for home visitors: "You can best support parents by ... partnering with community-based agencies/early intervention services."). The curriculum does not provide specific guidance for home visitors on how to identify resources or how to support families in a referral process.

Learning Environment: Growing Great Families and the curriculum manual minimally address accessibility of the home environment or learning materials for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. The module "Unique Needs: Being a Parent of a Child with Special Needs" offers general suggestions for parents and mentions the importance of making a "home environment safe and developmentally rich" for children with unique needs.

Parenting Practices and Interventions: The curriculum offers minimal guidance in Growing Great Families and the curriculum manual on adapting routines and learning experiences for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. The modules "Unique Needs: Being a Parent of a Child with Special Needs" and "Including Children with Special Needs" briefly mention the importance of adapting activities in the curriculum (e.g., "We can find and adapt activities that your child's care team feels are important.") and provide one example. However, the suggestions are limited and contained only in these two modules.

Growing Great Kids™: Prenatal–36 Months

Full Review & Ratings
Two star rating graphicEvidencia mínima

Resources and Referrals: The curriculum offers minimal support for home visitors to connect families of a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need to resources in the community. In a few places in Growing Great Families, the curriculum mentions the importance of connecting families with resources in the community if needed (e.g., Advice for home visitors: "You can best support parents by ... partnering with community-based agencies/early intervention services."). However, it does not provide specific guidance for home visitors on how to identify resources or how to support families in a referral process.

Learning Environment: Growing Great Families very minimally addresses accessibility of the home environment or learning materials for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. The module "Unique Needs: Being a Parent of a Child with Special Needs" offers general suggestions for parents and mentions the importance of making a "home environment safe and developmentally rich" for children with unique needs.

Parenting Practices and Interventions: The curriculum offers minimal guidance in Growing Great Families on adapting routines and learning experiences for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need. The module "Unique Needs: Being a Parent of a Child with Special Needs" includes a brief mention of the importance of adapting activities in the curriculum. The prompt says, "We can find and adapt activities that your child's care team feels are important," and provides one example. However, the information provided is vague and contained in the one section of the curriculum. Throughout the manuals, there is no information included on how specific activities can be adapted for a child with a disability, suspected delay, or other special need.