Currículo

El currículo apoya la receptividad cultural. La receptividad cultural es un enfoque basado en fortalezas para la enseñanza y el cuidado arraigado en el respeto y aprecio por el papel que desempeña la cultura en el aprendizaje y el desarrollo de los niños. Un currículo culturalmente receptivo les indica a los maestros que aprendan acerca de las fortalezas, habilidades, experiencias e intereses de cada niño según se desarrollan en la familia y la cultura del niño. El currículo proporciona orientación sobre cómo modificar y mejorar los planes y materiales del currículo para aprovechar estas fortalezas, habilidades, experiencias e intereses con el objetivo de incorporar la cultura de cada niño en el aula.

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Currículo

Valoración

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Interactions: Big Day for PreK lacks guidance on how to interact with diverse children and families in culturally responsive ways.

Learning Experiences: The curriculum does not offer any guidance on how to provide learning experiences that build on children's and families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs. The curriculum includes one activity at the end of the year to invite "cultural friends... parents, grandparents, caregivers, or neighbors who come from another country" to share a story, tradition, or food with the children, which acknowledges diverse cultures and ethnicities, but it does not necessarily authentically reflect children and families in the program.  

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides some learning materials that reflect diverse children and families (e.g., books). However, the curriculum provides minimal guidance on how to select learning materials that represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families in the program. Throughout the curriculum materials, only a few specific examples are provided (e.g., including multicultural figures in the block area, ensuring that dress-up clothes reflect children's diversity).

Core Knowledge® Preschool Sequence

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Interactions: The curriculum provides some general considerations for working with culturally and linguistically diverse families and children. For example, the Handbook explains that there may be cultural differences related to parent involvement or communication styles. However, the curriculum lacks specific guidance on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with children and families.

Learning Experiences: Core Knowledge® does not offer any guidance on how to provide learning experiences that build on children's and families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs. Rather, the approach is to help all children learn the same content, regardless of their family and economic background.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides minimal guidance on how to use learning materials that authentically represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families. The Handbook suggests stories "include content related to the cultures of English language learners." The curriculum lacks guidance on how to select learning materials that represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families in the program.

The Creative Curriculum® for Preschool, 6th Edition

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Interactions: The curriculum provides guidance about culturally responsive ways of interacting with diverse children and families. Volume 1: The Foundation provides specific suggestions for how teachers can learn about children's and families' cultures. Additional curriculum resources, such as Volume 3: Literacy and Volume 6: Objectives for Development & Learning: Birth Through Third Grade, prompt teachers to consider how culture shapes families' values and interactions.

Learning Experiences: Volumes 1–6 consistently support culturally responsive learning experiences. Volume 1: The Foundation provides a general discussion of the importance of learning experiences that build on children's family and community cultures. Volumes 3–5 offer prompts to remind teachers to invite families to participate in the classroom and share aspects of their cultural heritage (e.g., invite families to share songs, dances, or musical instruments used in their cultures). However, the Teaching Guides and Intentional Teaching Cards lack specific guidance for how to integrate children's cultural traditions and practices into the learning experiences.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides specific guidance and examples embedded throughout Volumes 1–6 on selecting materials that reflect children's cultures and ethnicities (e.g., books and dramatic play props that respectfully depict the cultures of children in the classroom). In addition, the Children's Book Collection offers some consideration of society's diversity through portraying people from varied ethnic backgrounds, cultural identities, and life circumstances. However, the Teaching Guides and Intentional Teaching Cards lack guidance on how to select and use materials that authentically represent the cultures of children and families.

Curiosity Corner, 2nd Edition

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Interactions: The curriculum describes the importance of culturally responsive interactions with children and families. The Teacher's Manual suggests that teachers respect and value the home culture, promote and encourage the active involvement and support of all families, become informed on children's home cultures, and make an intentional effort to learn about the diverse cultural backgrounds of children in their classrooms. Even so, the curriculum provides no guidance on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with children and families.

Learning Experiences: Curiosity Corner encourages teachers to learn about the home cultures of the children in their groups. The Teacher's Manual explains that some cultures may not celebrate birthdays or holidays, but the curriculum lacks guidance on how to provide learning experiences that build on families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs. In the unit "Around the World," children learn about people from different places and cultures, but it does not guide the teacher to consider and plan according to the diverse cultures within the group.

Learning Environment: The Teacher's Manual states that cultural sensitivity impacts everything teachers do, including purchasing supplies. Some trade books included in the curriculum (e.g., A Chair for My Mother, Jonathan and His Mommy) reflect diverse children and families. In addition, the basic equipment list for the housekeeping area suggests providing "multi-ethnic" dolls and food. However, the curriculum does not provide guidance on how to select and use learning materials that authentically represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families in the program.

Galileo® Pre-K Online Curriculum

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Interactions: The curriculum provides some general guidance on cultural responsiveness. For example, the Curriculum Guidebook suggests being mindful to honor the special qualities of each culture represented without creating an emphasis on differences. In addition, the curriculum encourages teachers to communicate with families to learn about traditions, activities, and customs they keep at home, and not make assumptions about their cultural practices. However, the curriculum does not provide more specific guidance or strategies on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with diverse children and families.

Learning Experiences: Galileo® Pre-K gives some general guidance on how to provide learning experiences that build on families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs. For example, the Curriculum Guidebook reminds teachers to be sure activities are "multiculturally appropriate and respect diversity" and suggests incorporating an interest center featuring children's different cultures. It also recommends teachers use families as a source of culturally representative materials and activity ideas. However, the G3 Activities lack specific guidance on how to modify or plan learning experiences that authentically build on children's cultures.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides some general guidance for creating culturally responsive learning environments. For example, the Curriculum Guidebook suggests having a Cultural Heritage Interest Center with pictures, cultural items, recipes, and music that represent children's cultures. The Curriculum Guidebook also proposes including clothing and items that represent children's cultures in the House and Dramatic Play Interest Center and music and songs from different cultures and countries in the Music and Movement Interest Center. However, the curriculum does not provide specific guidance embedded throughout the learning activities on how to select and use learning materials that authentically represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families in the program.

HighScope Preschool Curriculum

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Interactions: The curriculum provides limited general guidance on culturally responsive ways to interact with diverse children and families. For example, the chapter "Involving Families in Active Learning Settings" encourages teachers to participate in community life to get to know families better or conduct home visits to learn about families' traditions and beliefs. However, the curriculum provides less information on how to use this information to engage in culturally responsive interactions with both children and families.

Learning Experiences: The curriculum provides some general recommendations for how to ensure learning experiences build on children's cultures. KDI 53—Diversity suggests that teachers include diversity in every classroom area and activity (e.g., visit local markets or events, celebrate holidays and traditions of families). Similarly, Social Studies asks teachers to provide materials across the interest areas that reflect children's home cultures, which would set the context learning experiences that build on children's cultures. However, the curriculum lacks guidance on how to plan or adapt learning experiences that build on families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs.

Learning Environment: The curriculum mentions the importance of using learning materials that represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families and provides some general guidance about selecting these materials. The curriculum primarily states to include items from children's cultures or items they would see in their homes, but there is less information about how to select such materials or how to use the materials in learning experiences.

Learn Every Day™: The Preschool Curriculum

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Interactions: The curriculum describes the importance of culturally responsive interactions with children. For example, Foundations for Learning suggests that teachers talk with parents and families to learn about the children's cultures, as culturally diverse children have vastly different experiences and teaching them effectively depends on respecting those differences. However, the curriculum lacks guidance or strategies on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with diverse children and families.

Learning Experiences: Learn Every Day suggests that teachers use authentic props and real items to connect with each child's prior learning. However, the curriculum does not address how to modify or plan learning experiences that authentically build on children's cultures.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides some general guidance for creating culturally responsive learning environments. Foundations for Learning explains that having a few dolls of different skin tones does not make a multicultural classroom, and that there should be models of children's cultures in each area of the classroom. It provides some guidance on how to authentically represent the children and families in the program. For example, the curriculum suggests that teachers ask families to share a favorite musical selection that reflects their culture or something the children like to do at home. However, there is a limited amount of guidance on cultural responsiveness, and it is not embedded throughout the curriculum materials.

DLM Early Childhood Express®

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Interactions: The Home Connections Resource Guide alludes to the importance of incorporating knowledge of the family and home culture into the curriculum, but it lacks guidance on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with children and families.

Learning Experiences: The Home Connections Resource Guide describes how families' experiences can enrich the classroom (e.g., children asking their parents about parents' names, where they are from, folklore), but the curriculum does not offer any guidance on how to provide learning experiences that build on children's and families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs.

Learning Environment: The curriculum includes many materials that depict children and families from diverse cultures and ethnicities (e.g., books, flip charts). However, it provides minimal guidance on how to select learning materials that represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families in the program. Some suggestions for materials in the learning centers (e.g., books about holidays and celebrations, crayons in flesh and hair tones, dress-up clothes) could represent the cultures of children and families in the program, but the curriculum does not make those explicit connections.

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Interactions: The curriculum provides some general guidance on cultural responsiveness. Each Teacher Guide begins with "From the Experts: Family Connections" and "From the Experts: Cultural Sensitivity," and these brief sections address understanding diversity (e.g., making explicit the cultural assumptions of "show and tell," discussing "ethnocentrism"). In addition, the curriculum includes a few specific examples of how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with diverse children and families (e.g., research appropriate greetings for children from different cultures; be sensitive to cultural differences related to eye contact).

Learning Experiences: The "From the Experts: Cultural Sensitivity" sections briefly remind teachers to consider culture or mention possible learning activities related to culture. For example, they suggest exposing children to variety of songs from diverse backgrounds and discussing the foods, music, dance, and dress for special celebrations in their families. However, the activities and learning centers in the Teaching Guides provide limited specific guidance on how to modify or plan learning experiences that authentically build on children's cultures (e.g., the curriculum mentions, "Yoga is an important daily routine in some cultures. Invite children with prior experience in yoga to demonstrate their favorite position.").

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides some learning materials that reflect diverse children and families (e.g., pictures in books). In addition, the curriculum provides limited specific guidance on how to select and use learning materials that authentically represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families in the program (e.g., an activity suggests making placemats that include photos of food from children's cultures).

Opening the World of Learning™ (OWL) ©2014

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Interactions: The Planning and Assessment: Teacher's Guide with Professional Development alludes to the importance of incorporating knowledge of family and home culture into the curriculum. It includes a section on "Common First Languages." For some languages, there is reference to "culture clues" that may influence communication (e.g., "Korean has a complex system of honorifics, so it is unusual for Korean students to use the pronoun ‘you’ or call their teachers by their first name."). However, the curriculum does not provide more specific guidance or strategies on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with diverse children and families.

Learning Experiences: "Daily Team Talk" and "Turn and Talk" activities provide opportunities for children to share information about themselves and their families. In addition, the "Connecting with Families" section of the Planning and Assessment: Teacher's Guide with Professional Development briefly reminds teachers to encourage family members to visit and share cultural traditions, a practice that acknowledges diverse cultures and ethnicities. However, the curriculum lacks specific guidance on how to modify or plan learning experiences that authentically build on children's cultures.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides some learning materials that reflect diverse children and families (e.g., books), but it does not provide guidance on how to select and use learning materials that authentically represent the cultures and ethnicities of children and families in the program.

The InvestiGator Club® PreKindergarten Learning System

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Interactions: The curriculum provides limited guidance for working with culturally and linguistically diverse families and children. For example, an ELL callout box in a Teacher Guide encourages teachers to be aware of children's cultural communication differences. It explains that, in some cultures, calling attention to oneself may be considered overly assertive and suggests that teachers invite children to share with a partner rather than the whole group. However, the curriculum lacks further guidance on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with children and families.

Learning Experiences: InvestiGator PreK offers minimal guidance on how to provide learning experiences that build on children's and families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs. Many Languages, One Classroom describes some practices that acknowledge diverse cultures and ethnicities. For example, the Language Advisory Committee might collect recipes from the different cultures represented in each classroom to use for lesson plans, and teachers might ask family members to demonstrate how to play traditional children's games from their culture. In addition, some of the ELL callout boxes identify ways children can share their cultures as part of activities (e.g., children share pictures of clothing worn in their home countries). However, the activities and Learning Centers in the Teacher Guides lack specific guidance on how to plan learning experiences that authentically build on children's cultures. One of the curriculum's characters (JT Gator) knows a lot about traditions and customs of people around the world and acts as a gateway to experiences that relate to diverse cultures. However, the learning experiences set around this character do not build on the cultures or languages of children in the group.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides general guidance on selecting materials that reflect children's cultures and ethnicities. For example, Many Languages, One Classroom suggests asking families to equip the dramatic play area with authentic items from their homes, neighborhoods, or countries of origin or to send in games from their home countries. A limitation is that such guidance is limited to Many Languages, One Classroom, and this professional development resource is not referenced anywhere else in the curriculum.

The InvestiGator Club® Just for Threes Learning System

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Interactions: The curriculum provides limited guidance for working with culturally and linguistically diverse families and children. For example, the Social and Emotional Development Kit Activity Guide reminds teachers to make sure children are aware of the other perspectives of children from diverse backgrounds and cultures. However, the curriculum lacks further guidance on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with children and families.

Learning Experiences: Just for Threes lacks guidance on how to provide learning experiences that build on children's and families' traditions, cultures, values, and beliefs. One of the curriculum's characters (JT Gator) is fascinated by geography, culture, and travel, knows a lot about traditions and customs of people around the world and acts as a gateway to experiences that relate to diverse cultures. However, the learning experiences set around his character do not build on the cultures or languages of children in the group.

Learning Environment: The curriculum suggests some children's books (e.g., Be My Neighbor, Abuela) and includes some materials (e.g., Vocabulary and Oral Language Cards) that reflect children and families from diverse cultures and ethnicities. However, the curriculum lacks guidance on selecting and using materials that authentically represent the cultures and ethnicities of children in the group.

Two star rating graphicEvidencia mínima

Interactions: The curriculum does not offer guidance on how to engage in culturally responsive interactions with children and families (e.g., learning about the families' expectations, practices, and routines within their family and culture). In one activity (Story Lab on Character Empathy), the curriculum refers to cultural differences, pointing out that different cultures express and interpret emotions in different ways. However, the curriculum does not discuss culturally responsive ways of interacting with diverse children and families.

Learning Experiences: The curriculum discusses the importance of showing respect for all cultures and all languages in the classroom. In the section "Specific Additional Scaffolds for Dual Language Learners," the curriculum encourages teachers of children who are DLLs to create themes that support children's cultures and language use and to make sure that children's home cultures are naturally represented throughout the day. A "tourist approach" (e.g., having a special celebration related to culture occasionally) is to be avoided. For Make-Believe Play, the curriculum encourages teachers to incorporate scenarios that represent the children's cultures. However, the curriculum provides minimal guidance on how to provide or adapt learning experiences that build on the families' traditions, cultures, and values.

Learning Environment: The curriculum provides minimal guidance on how to select and use learning materials that reflect cultural diversity. The section "Specific Additional Scaffolds for Dual Language Learners" encourages teachers to choose books that celebrate the children's backgrounds and to make sure that children's home cultures are represented throughout the day "in a natural way." Curriculum materials, such as "Daily Schedule Cards" and "Story Lab Mediator Cards," include images that reflect children and families from diverse cultures and ethnicities. Similarly, the "Let's Pretend" e-books depict community helpers, family members, and other adults of many ethnicities. However, the curriculum lacks guidance on how to use learning materials that represent the cultures and the ethnicities of the children and families in the program.