The Foundations for School Readiness: Fostering Developmental Competence in the Earliest Years

Technical Assistance Paper No. 6

Research demonstrates the critical role early relationships play in fostering young children's social and emotional development and shaping their cognition. This paper is intended to help program staff impact the future of children who are vulnerable to school failure. Staff may use this resource to help children develop characteristics that are now proven to be predictors of later success in school, including confidence, curiosity, intentionality, self-control, relatedness, and the capacity to communicate and cooperate. Note: This resource is under review.

The Foundations for School Readiness: Fostering Developmental Competence in the Earliest Years Early childhood programs recognize the importance of preparing children for success in school and later in life. Head Start has long been a leader in this effort and in defining the goal of social competence. Considering recent media attention on the importance of the early years of life, policymakers, researchers, parents, and child advocates have an increased interest in what it takes to fully prepare children to succeed in school. In addition, the rising number of working parents has increased the demand for high-quality child care for very young children. See The Foundations for School Readiness [PDF, 14MB]

The Foundations for School Readiness: Fostering Developmental Competence in the Earliest Years. Technical Assistance Paper No. 6. HHS/ACF/ACYF/HSB. 2003. English. [PDF, 14MB].

Last Reviewed: November 2016

Last Updated: November 21, 2016