The Well-Child Health Care Fact Game: [A Learning Activity]

There are many elements of well-child health care in Head Start including screenings, education, advocacy, and accessibility to providers. This game helps program staff become familiar with well-child health care and screening. Requiring approximately 30 to 45 minutes to complete, the activity utilizes a game board and a question and answer key (for the trainer only), both included here.

The following is an excerpt from Well-Child Care Making It Happen.

Purpose
For This Activity You Will
     Game Board
     Question & Answer Key
Trainer Preparation Note
Steps
Points To Consider

Purpose: This activity familiarizes participants with the common components of well-child health care required for Head Start. It is helpful for staff from different areas of Head Start.

For this activity you will need:

  • Flip chart paper
  • Paper and pens or pencils
  • Game board [PDF, 14KB]
  • Question & Answer Key (For Trainer Only) [PDF, 14KB]
  • Prizes (e.g., stars, healthy snacks, pencils, etc.)
  • Overhead projector and transparency (Optional)
  • Stopwatch or Timer

Trainer Preparation Note:

Prepare the game board on a large piece of cardboard, flip chart paper, or overhead transparency.

Step 1: Explain that participants will play a team game with questions and answers about well-child health care and screening.

Step 2: Explain that the game will focus on the common components of well-child health care for Head Start.

Step 3: Divide participants into teams of four to six members. Ask each team to name itself. Write the teams' names on flip chart paper and post it as a scorecard.

Step 4: Display the Game Board, explaining the following rules:

  • Teams will answer questions under four categories:
    • What It Is
    • Why You Do It
    • What You Might Observe
    • How You Do It

  • Each category has questions that increase in value and difficulty, from $100, $200, $300, $400, to $500.
  • Teams have 30 seconds to discuss the question and formulate their answer. When the time is up, the team that selected the question gives its answer. If the team has no answer or gives an incorrect answer, the next team gets the chance to answer.
  • The team with the correct answer wins the dollar value for the question. No points are deducted for incorrect answers.

Step 5: Ask the first team to start by selecting a category and dollar value. Cross out the selection on the Game Board. Using the Question and Answer Key, read the question aloud.

Step 6: Follow your watch, set a timer, or play a musical tape for 30 seconds while the teams discuss their responses.

Step 7: Ask the team that selected the category for its answer. Proceed to the next team(s) until the correct answer is stated. Add the dollar value to the score of the team that answers correctly. If no team states the correct answer, read the answer aloud.

Step 8: Ask the next team to select the category and dollar value for the next question.

Continue playing the game as in Steps 5 to 7 until all the questions have been asked.

Step 9: At the end of the game, add up each team's money. The team(s) with the most money wins. You may give the winners a prize.

Points to Consider:

  • It is helpful for staff to be familiar with the facts about well-child health care and screening. However, it is most important to be aware of what you do and don't know and where you can get the information that you need.
  • Your key resources for health information are written materials and health professionals. Since health information advances rapidly, written material may become out-of-date. Programs need reliable health consultants to keep them informed about new information and to update the program's written materials (e.g., fact sheets) every year.

See also:
     Game Board [PDF, 14KB] 
     Question & Answer Key [PDF, 14KB]

"The Well-Child Health Care Fact Game: [A Learning Activity]." Well-Child Health Care: Making It Happen. Training Guides for the Head Start Learning Community. HHS/ACF/ACYF/HSB. 1998. English.

Last Reviewed: May 2009

Last Updated: August 27, 2015