Family with child

Content Area:

Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships

This Content Area Covers:

  • What are Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships?
  • How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with families?
  • How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with staff and community partners?

Introduction

Effective Parent, Family, and Community Engagement (PFCE) helps children and families thrive. For Head Start and Early Head Start programs to make progress toward family outcomes, they must build strong and effective partnerships with the families they serve. Such partnerships emerge from positive, ongoing, and goal-oriented relationships. Program staff develop Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships by using relationship-based strategies that show respect for families and build on their strengths.

The Office of Head Start (OHS) PFCE Framework uses an arrow to depict "Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships." The arrow moves across all of the Program Foundations, Program Impact Areas, and Family Engagement and Child Outcomes. It highlights the essential role of relationships, as well as the importance of relationship-based practices and strategies across all Head Start and Early Head Start systems and services. This guide explores ways to build and enhance Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships in your work with families.

At-a-Glance

A
Learning Extension A
Boosting School Readiness through Effective Family Engagement: Intake Visit
B
Learning Extension B
Expectations of Staff and Families
C
Learning Extension C
Finley's Parent-Teacher Conference
D
Learning Extension D
Integrating Strategies for Program Progress, Part II
E
Learning Extension E
Learning in Partnership: Reflective Practice in Action
F
Learning Extension F
Positive Goal Oriented Relationships
G
Learning Extension G
Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships: Reflecting on Our Work with Families
H
Learning Extension H
Reflections During the Final Home Visit
I
Learning Extension I
Relationship-Based Practices for Working with Staff and Community Partners
J
Learning Extension J
Strength-based Attitudes and Relationship-based Practices
K
Learning Extension K
Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices in Reflective Supervision
L
Learning Extension L
Strength-Based Attitudes for Staff and Community Partners
Learning Extension A
Boosting School Readiness through Effective Family Engagement: Intake Visit
  Estimated Time: 45-60 minutes

What you say and do matters! Use this simulation to practice relationship-based strategies to help develop Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with families.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with families?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Download the intake visit PFCE Simulation to your computer. This will allow you to use the simulation without being connected to the internet.
  • Read the directions provided with the PFCE Simulation and explore how the simulation works.
  • Review the PFCE Simulation Course Summary.
  • Print copies of the PFCE Simulation Course Summary as a handout for your group. Share with group members to read before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout.

Tip: Visit http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/family/center/pfce_simulation/instructions.html and select "Having Trouble Using the Simulation" for instructions on how to download the PFCE Simulation to your computer.

Tip: This simulation can be used with individual practice. Refer to the instructions for the online simulation for additional ways to use the simulation in your individual practice.

Directions:

  1. Explain to your group that you are going to work with a digital, interactive tool, the PFCE Simulation: Boosting School Readiness through Effective Family Engagement, Intake Visit. Tell them that this tool provides an opportunity to explore a relationship between a provider and family from the perspective of a home visit.

  2. Depending on the size of the group, and the amount of time you have, either divide into small groups or work together as a whole.

  3. Explain that you'll be using the simulation to rehearse a conversation between a provider and a parent. There will be opportunities to choose how the provider in the simulation responds to what the parent says.

    • If you are working in smaller groups, explain that the smaller groups will have an opportunity to discuss the choices and vote on which one to choose.
  4. Begin the PFCE Simulation. Pause after each step to allow the group(s) to discuss how the provider should interact with the parent. Ask the group(s) to vote on which response to use.

  5. Each time a choice is made, watch what happens next in the simulation. Remind the group members to pay attention to the relationship meter. Encourage a discussion by asking:

    • What did you notice about the parent's response?
    • Was it what you expected?
    • Why did that choice work or not work?
  6. At the end of the simulation, debrief with the group about what they observed and what they are still wondering.

  7. If time allows, do the simulation again, encouraging the group to make different choices. Option: When a choice is made, use the undo button and allow the group members to choose a different response to see what happens. Remember to provide time for the group(s) to reflect on the experience and on what they are learning by working with the simulation.

  8. Review the PFCE Simulation Course Summary with the group. Ask group members which of the techniques or strategies listed they observed during the simulation. Provide time to share and reflect.

  9. Ask group members to review the list of pitfalls on page 2 of the Course Summary. Ask them to turn to those they are sitting with to discuss what they notice about this list. How can they use what they learned from the simulation to help avoid these pitfalls?

  10. Provide time for group members to share their insights from their conversations with their partners.

  11. Wrap up the session by highlighting the themes and strategies that emerged.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Use the PFCE Simulation by yourself and then print out the transcript to discuss with a peer. Share you experience, insights, and questions with each other.
Learning Extension B
Expectations of Staff and Families
  Estimated Time: 30-60 minutes

Clarify and discuss the expectations that staff and families have of each other. Discover how the practice of "perspective taking" can help build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with families?

Resources you will need:

  • Flip-chart paper and markers
  • Document: Reflective Practice Tool (see Appendix A)

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Prepare two flip charts with the following headings, one per page:
    • "What do you expect of families?"
    • "What do families expect of you?"
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Directions:

  1. Divide the whole group into smaller groups of three to six people. Ask each group to identify a note taker and a reporter.

  2. Ask groups to discuss the first question, "What do you expect of families?"

    • Have them review their responses and identify their two most important expectations.
    • Remind them they will be asked to share these expectations with the whole group.
  3. Ask groups to discuss the second question, "What do families expect of you?"

    • Have them identify the two most important expectations that families have for program staff.
  4. Ask the small groups to share the expectations they discussed with the larger group. Record their responses on the flip-chart paper you have prepared. Encourage the small group members to clarify or expand on the expectations, using the discussion questions below:

    • What would it look like to have families meet our expectations?
    • What would it look like to meet the expectations of families?
    • How will you know if families' expectations are being met?
  5. Facilitate a whole-group discussion by asking the participants to compare the two flip charts and reflect on the common themes they see.

  6. Wrap up the discussion by asking group members to reflect on the following questions:

    • What was affirming or surprising about this discussion?
    • How will this exercise influence your work with families of the future?
  7. Finally, review the following key points with the group:

    • Common values we share with families are concern for their children and a desire for their children to succeed.
    • Our expectations are part of our perspective and influence how we view families' behaviors.
    • When families do not meet our expectations of them, we often make assumptions about why.
    • These assumptions can affect our relationships with families and how we respond to them.
    • When expectations are not met, challenges can arise in our relationships with families.
    • By exploring our expectations, we can better understand our perspective (i.e., values, biases, and hot buttons). We can use this understanding to help us determine what strategies to use with families when challenges arise.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Encourage your group members to consider how they might use "perspective taking" in their ongoing work with families, other staff, and community partners.
  • Consider adding "reflecting on staff and family expectations and perspectives" to your process for reviewing cases.
  • Review the second competency from the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies:Self-Aware and Culturally Responsive Relationships. Reflect on your knowledge, skills, and actions. What are your strengths? What opportunities can you find to increase your knowledge and strengthen your skills and actions? What can you do next to strengthen your Self-Awareness and Cultural Responsiveness?
Learning Extension C
Finley's Parent-Teacher Conference
  Estimated Time: 20-30 minutes

Observe how one teacher uses relationship-based strategies to build a Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship with a family.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship with families?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions
  • Preview the video Finley's Parent-Teacher Conference
  • Print copies of Attitudes and Practices for Positive, Goal-Oriented Relationships and pages 6-17 of Building Partnerships as handouts for your group. Share with group members to read before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Tip: You may complete this learning extension in a group or by yourself. If you are working alone, consider what opportunities there are to talk to others about the readings and share your reflections.

Directions:

  1. Explain to the group that they will be watching a video of a parent-teacher conference. Note that the program depicted in the video may be different from their program, but that they should focus on the teacher. Ask the group to observe how the teacher uses Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices to build a Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship with the family.

  2. Review the summary of "Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices" from page 18 of Building Partnerships. Encourage group members to use the summary to help them identify the strategies the teacher uses to connect with the family in the video.

  3. Watch the video.

  4. After viewing the video, lead a discussion using the following questions:

    • Which of the Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices did you n otice the teacher using to engage this family?
    • What did the teacher do or say that demonstrated her use of the Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices?
    • Did you observe any missed opportunities to use the attitudes and practices?
    • What might you do differently?
    • How did the relationship between the teacher and family contribute to progress toward family and child outcomes?
  5. Watch for opportunities to connect your group's observations and reflections to how to build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships.

  6. Highlight observations about the relationships between staff members and parent and parent and child. Explore with your group how these contribute to making progress toward family and child outcomes.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Review the fourth competency from the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies: Parent-Child Relationships and Families as Lifelong Educators. Reflect on your knowledge, skills, and actions. What are your strengths? What opportunities can you find to strengthen your skills? Identify what Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices you will use as you work on strengthening these skills.
Learning Extension D
Integrating Strategies for Program Progress, Part II
  Estimated Time: 45-60 minutes

Work with stories from Head Start and Early Head Start programs to identify specific strategies used to support implementation of the PFCE Framework and how Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships contribute to success.

Guiding Question: What are Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Review ISPP Part II and pages 6-18 of Building Partnerships.
  • Print copies of ISPP Part II and pages 6-18 of Building Partnerships as handouts for your group. Share with group members to read before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Directions:

  1. Explain that together you will be hearing stories about people and situations in Head Start and Early Head Start settings. These stories explore how to use Strength-based Attitudes and Relationship-based Practices as strategies to engage families and community through Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships.

    • The first story is about Anna, a newly hired family service worker. She has creative ideas about how her program can approach Family Partnership Agreements.
    • The second story is about Alecia, her two young daughters, and Joseph, the family's home visitor.
  2. If your group is large, form small groups of three to five people. If you have a smaller group, work together as a whole.

  3. Assign a story to each group or ask the group members to choose a story.

  4. Follow the outline of "Exercise Instructions" on pages 9-13 from ISPP Part II, guiding the group(s) through the questions and discussion.

  5. During the discussion, look for opportunities to identify where the Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices connect to the strategies that the group identifies.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Complete any of the follow-up activities from pages 12-13 of ISPP Part II and incorporate identified strategies into current or future program plans.
Learning Extension E
Learning in Partnership: Reflective Practice in Action
  Estimated Time: 20-30 minutes

See how one program uses reflective practice with both staff and families to build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships, which contribute to goal setting and genuine partnerships.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with staff and community partners?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Preview the video Learning in Partnership: Using Data and Reflective Practice in Programs.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Tip:You may complete this learning extension in a group or by yourself. If you are working alone, consider what opportunities there may be to talk to others about the video using the guiding questions.

Directions:

  1. Introduce the video by explaining to the group that you will see how one program is using reflective practice with both staff and families to build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships, which contribute to goal setting and genuine partnerships.

  2. Watch the video with your group.

  3. Lead a group discussion, using the following questions:

  4. What specific strategies did you see staff members use to engage families and build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships?
  5. What specific strategies did you see staff members use to integrate Relationship-Based Practices across systems and services?
  6. Did you observe any missed opportunities to engage families through Positive Goal-Oriented relationships? What might you do differently?

  7. Watch for opportunities to connect your group members' observations and reflections to the process of engagement through Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships. Be sure to point out observations the groups share that highlight strategies to integrate relationship-based practice across program systems and services.

  8. Wrap up discussion by asking the group members to reflect on the following questions:

  9. What strategies would you want to use or strengthen in your own program?
  10. How would you integrate these strategies into your existing program plans?

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Review the first competency from the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies: Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships. Reflect on your knowledge, skills, and actions. What are your strengths? What opportunities can you find to increase your knowledge and strengthen your skills and actions? What can you do next to use data to inform your program's services and fuel continuous improvement?
Learning Extension F
Positive Goal Oriented Relationships
  Estimated Time: 30-45 minutes

Discover the meaning of relationship-based practice and learn strategies for building Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships across all areas of the OHS PFCE Framework.

Guiding Question: What are Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions
  • Review the "Definitions" section on pages 2-5 of the document Building Partnerships.
  • Print copies of Building Partnerships and Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies as handouts for your group. Share with group members to read before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Tip: You may complete this learning extension in a group or by yourself. If you are working alone, consider what opportunities there are to talk to others about the readings and share your reflections.

Directions:

  1. Share the definition of "Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship" with your group: A Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship is a mutually respectful and intentional partnership with a family, focused on promoting family and child outcomes.

  2. Ask your group to consider a time when they expereinced a Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship with a family. Ask group members to consider the following questions as they reflect on their experiences:

    • What happened in this relationship?
    • What was it like for the family?
    • What was it like for you?
    • How did this relationship contribute to achieving family and child outcomes?
    • What strategies were used to build and sustain this relationship?
  3. Divide into smaller groups of two to three people. Review the following directions with them before starting:

    • Review the first Relationship-Based Competency from page 5 of the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies: Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships.
    • Share when you experienced a Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship with a particular family.
    • Identify two or three skills or strategies you used to build and sustain that relationship. Be prepared to share these skills or strategies and how you used them with the whole group.
  4. Allow time for small groups to share and discuss.

  5. Debrief the activity by asking each small group to share with the whole group.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Discuss your reflections in a reflective supervision or coaching session. What do these reflections mean for your work with families?
  • Review the first competency from the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship Based Competencies:Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships. Reflect on your knowledge, skills, and actions. What skills would you like to enhance? Determine what you will need (professional development, coaching, etc.) to develop these skills.
Learning Extension G
Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships: Reflecting on Our Work with Families
  Estimated Time: 30-45 minutes

Explore how we can use self-reflection to work more effectively with families and contribute to better outcomes for children and families.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with families?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Review the Reflective Strategies section on pages 19-20 of the document Building Partnerships.
  • Print copies of pages 19-20 of Building Partnerships as a handout for your group. Share with group members to read before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Tip: You may complete this learning extension in a group or by yourself. If you are working alone, consider what opportunities there may be to talk to others about the readings and share reflections.

Directions:

  1. Review the "Reflective Strategies" section of Building Partnerships with the group.

  2. Ask group members to discuss the Self-Reflection section with a partner and discuss the following questions:

    • What types of experiences have you had with self-reflection?
    • How might you continue to use self-reflection in your work?
  3. Provide time for group members who want to share the highlights of their discussions to do so.

  4. Summarize the discussions by highlighting the themes that emerged. Encourage group members to identify one strategy they will use to implement self-reflection in their daily routines.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Use the "Your Reflections" section on pages 6-18 of Building Partnerships to guide discussions during staff meetings, individual journaling, and as part of reflective supervision.
Learning Extension H
Reflections During the Final Home Visit
  Estimated Time: 20-30 minutes

Hear firsthand from a parent about her experiences with her home visitor. Explore the role of relationships and relationship-based strategies in making progress toward family and child outcomes.

Guiding Question:What are Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Preview the video Reflections During the Final Home Visit.
  • Review the "Definitions" section on pages 2-5 of the document Building Partnerships.
  • Print copies of pages 2-5 of Building Partnerships as a handout for your group. Share with group members to read before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Tip: You may complete this learning extension in a group or by yourself. If you are working alone, consider what opportunities there are to talk to others about the readings and share your reflections.

Directions:

  1. Review the "Definitions" section of Building Partnerships with your group.

  2. Introduce the video to the group and ask them to watch for strategies that contribute to building a Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship between the mother and home visitor.

  3. After viewing the video, lead a discussion using two or three of the following questions as a guide:

    • What specifics strategies did you notice the home visitor using to engage this family?
    • How did the strategies build a Positive Goal-Oriented Relationship with this family?
    • Which outcome areas may be impacted by this relationship?
    • Did you observe any missed opportunities?
    • What might you do differently?
    • How did the relationship between the home visitor and mother contribute to this family's progress toward family and child outcomes?
  4. Watch for opportunities to connect your group's observations and reflections to the concepts of relationship-based strategies and Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships. Be sure to highlight observations that illustrate the role of relationships in progress toward positive outcomes for families and children.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Review the first competency from the Head Start and Early Start Relationship-Based Competencies: Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships. Reflect on your knowledge, skills, and actions. What are your strengths? What opportunities can you find to increase your knowledge and strengthen your skills and actions? Choose one area of knowledge or skill to focus on strengthening in your practice. Identify two or three ways you can work on this knowledge or skill. Share your plan with a colleague. Consider using the Relationship-Based Competencies: Self Assessment Tool for Staff or Self-Assessment Tool for Supervisors to track your progress.
Learning Extension I
Relationship-Based Practices for Working with Staff and Community Partners
  Estimated Time: 30-45 minutes

Explore how to use Relationship-Based Practices as strategies to build relationships among staff and community partners. Identify which practices you use and which ones you want to use to strengthen your work with other staff and community partners.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with staff and community partners?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Review the "Reflective Strategies" section on pages 20-22 of Building Partnerships.
  • Print copies of pages 20-22 from Building Partnerships as a handout for your group. Share with group members to review ahead of time, or provide time during the session for them to review.
  • Prepare flip-chart paper by writing one of the following Relationship-based Practices at the top of each page and posting them around the room:
    • Reflect on the staff's perspective
    • Support the staff's competence
    • Focus on the family-staff relationship
    • Value the staff's passion
    • Make time for your own reflection
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Directions:

  1. Explain to your group that just as Head Start and Early Head Start staff strive to engage parents and families in trusting, respectful relationships, it is important that staff have the same kind of relationship with colleagues, supervisors, and community partners.

  2. Remind staff that using Strength-Based Attitudes will support the development and use of Relationship-Based-Practices.

  3. Show group members that each Relationship-Based Practice is written on a flip chart and posted somewhere in the room. Ask them to review these and select one practice that they either have used or want to know more about.

  4. Ask the group members to stand by the chart with the Relationship-Based Practice they have chosen.

  5. Ask each group member to write down two to three ideas about each Relationship-Based Practice, using the following questions as prompts:

    • What does this Relationship-Based Practice mean to you?
    • What does it look like when you are using this practice to help build relationship with other staff and community partners?
  6. Ask the group members to move around the room and add additional ideas and strategies for each of the practices posted on the flip charts. Once each person has visited each flip chart, provide time for the group to review the comments on each flip chart.

  7. Debrief by reviewing each Relationship-Based Practice and providing time for group members to share what they noticed about the comments and strategies for each.

  8. Summarize the themes that emerged during the discussions. Discuss the ideas the group had for how Relationship-Based Practices can be used as strategies to strengthen the relationships among staff, and between staff and community partners, as part of implementing the OHS PFCE Framework across program systems and services.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and note reflections in the space provided.
  • Use the Relationship-Based-Practices as a foundation to guide reflections during staff meetings, individual journaling, or peer-to-peer conversations. How can you use these practices to respond to challenges that arise between staff and community partners?
  • Review the seventh competency from the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies: Coordinated, Integrated, and Comprehensive Services. Reflect on the skills identified for this competency. What are your strengths? What can you do next to strengthen your skills? Identify which Relationship-Based Practices you will use to help strengthen the skills you identified.
Learning Extension J
Strength-based Attitudes and Relationship-based Practices
  Estimated Time: 30-45 minutes

Explore how to sue the strategies of Strength-based Attitudes and Relationship-based Practices to build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships. Identify which Strength-based Attitudes and Relationship-based Practices you have experienced and which ones you want to strengthen in your work with families.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with families?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Review the Tools, Strength-Based Attitudes, and Relationship-Based Practice, and pages 6-17 of the document Building Partnerships.
  • Print copies of pages 6-17 of Building Partnerships as a handout for your group. Share before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the document Attitudes and Practices for Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships and the Reflective Practice Tool as handouts for your group.

Tip: You may complete this learning extension in a group or by yourself. If you are working alone, consider what opportunities there are to talk to others about the readings and share your reflections.

Directions:

  1. Share the definition of "attitude" with your group:

    • An attitude is a frame of mind that we take toward someone.
  2. Ask your group members what comes to mind when they hear this definition. Ask the group to give examples of instances when an attitude impacted an interaction with someone.

  3. Use the following questions to guide a group discussion:

    • How might our attitudes affect our behavior?
    • How might our attitudes affect our interactions with others?
    • What are examples of positive and negative attitudes that can affect our interactions with others?
  4. Summarize by highlighting how the examples demonstrate that our attitudes affect our behaviors toward others. Positive attitudes help us to take a strength-based approach in our interactions with others.

  5. Review the summary of "Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices" on page 18 of Building Partnerships with your group. Ask group members to:

    • Consider a time when they experienced one of these attitudes or practices. Encourage them to share.
    • Review the Relationship-based Practices and identify one that they have used or one that they would like to use.
  6. Find a partner and discuss.

  7. Ask group members to share what they have discovered in their conversations and what they are still wondering.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:'

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Use the reflection questions provided in Building Partnerships to guide discussions during staff meetings, individual journaling, or peer-to-peer conversations.
  • Review the first competency from the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship Based Competencies:Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships. Reflect on the skills identified for this competency. What are your strengths? What can you do next to strengthen your skills? Identify which Relationship-Based Practices you could use to support the skills you have identified.
Learning Extension K
Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices in Reflective Supervision
  Estimated Time: 20-30 minutes

Do you supervise staff? Or work with staff teams who talk about and support each other's work? Observe how relationship-based strategies can be used during reflective supervision. Explore how the Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices (Adapted for Staff) can be applied during reflective supervision with staff.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with staff and community partners?

Resources you will need:

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Preview minutes 47:20 - 52:39 from the webcast Reflective Supervision: Putting It Into Perspective.
  • Print copies of pages 20-23 from Building Partnerships as a handout for your group. Share with group members to read before the session, or include time for reading during the session.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Tip: This learning extension can be done individually or in a group. If done alone consider what opportunities there may be to talk to others about the video using the guiding questions.

Directions:

  1. Explain to your group that they will be watching a video of a reflective supervision role play between a supervisor and staff person in a Head Start/Early Head Start program.

  2. Review the summaries of Reflective Practice and Reflective Supervision from page 23 of Building Partnerships. Encourage group members to use this page while they watch the video to help them identify the Strength-based Attitudes and Relationship-based Practices the supervisor uses to connect with and help the staff person reflect on their experiences.

3.Watch the video.

  1. Lead a discussion with the group about the video, using the following questions: - Which Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices did you see being used? - What did the supervisor do or say that demonstrated their use of Strength-Based Attitudes and/or Relationship-Based Practices? - Did you observe any missed opportunities to use Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices? If so, what were they and what might you do differently? Which Strength-Based Attitudes or Relationship-Based Practices would you use?

  2. Watch for opportunities to connect your group's observations and reflections about using Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices to build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships among staff.

  3. Highlight observations about the relationships between staff members, and how they influence relationships between staff and families. Explore with your group how the use of Strength-Based Attitudes and Relationship-Based Practices contributes to implementing relationship-based strategies in your programs systems and services.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • Review the seventh competency from the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies: Coordinated, Integrated, and Comprehensive Services. Reflect on the skills identified for this competency. What are your strengths? What can you do next to strengthen your skills? Identify which Relationship-Based-Practices you will use to help strengthen the skills you identified.
Learning Extension L
Strength-Based Attitudes for Staff and Community Partners
  Estimated Time: 30-45 minutes

Explore how to use Strength-Based Attitudes as strategies for building relationships with staff and community partners. Identify which Strength-Based Attitudes you have experienced and which ones you want to strengthen in your work with other staff and community partners.

Guiding Question: How can I build Positive Goal-Oriented Relationships with staff and community partners?

Resources you will need: - Document: Building Partnerships: Guide to Developing Relationships with Families: Reflective Supervision (pages 20-22) - Document: Reflective Practice Tool (see Appendix A)

Before you begin:

  • Review the directions.
  • Review the "Reflective Supervision" section on pages 20-22 of Building Partnerships.
  • Print copies of pages 20-22 of Building Partnerships as handouts for your group. Share with group members to review ahead of time, or provide during the session for them to review.
  • Print copies of the Reflective Practice Tool as a handout for your group.

Directions:

  1. Explain to your group that just as Head Start and Early Head Start staff members strive to engage parents and families in trusting, respectful relationships, it is also important that staff create these relationships with colleagues, supervisors, and community partners.

  2. Share the definition of "attitude" with your group:

    • A attitude is a frame of mind that we take toward someone.
  3. Begin a group discussion by asking, "How does our attitude, our frame of mind, affect how we interact with staff or community partners?"

  4. Refer your group to the list of Strength-Based Attitudes (Adapted for Staff) on page 21 of Building Partnerships. Ask them to review these and identify one attitude they have used or would like to use in supporting them in being strength-based with staff members.

  5. Ask the group members to individually think about a challenging interaction they have had with another staff member or community partner. Ask them to consider the following questions:

    • Which Strength-based Attitude do you find challenging to use in this situation?
    • Choosing one of the attitudes, what would you do to operate from this attitude in this situation?
    • How would using this attitude change what you might do in this situation?
    • How might this affect the outcome of your interaction?
  6. Divide the whole group into pairs. Ask the pairs to share their reflections to the questions above with their partner.

  7. Debrief by providing time for group members to share what they discovered in their conversations and what they are still wondering about.

  8. Summarize the themes that emerged in the discussions. Discuss the ideas for how the Strength-Based Attitudes (Adapted for Staff) might be used in your program to strengthen the relationships among staff, and between staff and community partners, as part of implementing the OHS PFCE Framework across program systems and services.

Reflective Practice Opportunities:

  • Using the Reflective Practice Tool, review the last three questions and write your reflections in the space provided.
  • As challenges arise amongst staff or between staff and community partners, reflect on how Strength-Based Attitudes can support you in building a Positive and Goal-Oriented Relationship.
  • Review the seventh competency of the Head Start and Early Head Start Relationship-Based Competencies: Coordinated, Integrated, and Comprehensive Services. Reflect on the skills identified for this competency. What are your strengths? What can you do next to strengthen your skills? Identify which Strength-Based Attitudes you will use to help strengthen the skills you identified.