Foundations for Excellence

Example 4

puzzle piece iconParent, Family, and Community Engagement: PFCE/Community Job Losses

SCENARIO

Community Assessment and Ongoing Community Engagement
In their annual update of their community assessment, All of Us Together, Inc., learned that two of the largest employers in the community will be closing. This may affect more than half the families in the program. Knowing this will have different impacts on families as they deal with stresses related to unemployment, staff wanted to know, "How can we make a positive difference for our families during this time of change?" A planning committee involving staff, members of the governing body, family members, and community partners was formed. The committee developed and asked all enrolled families to complete a survey about family well-being. The staff aggregated data from the survey and found that families were already feeling a high level of anxiety about the impending layoffs, including wanting to know how to best support their children.

Planning Update
The collected program data assisted staff in looking at ways they could support parents to connect with community resources for alleviating anxiety and finding other options for job opportunities throughout the five-year project period.

During Ongoing Monitoring and Continuous Program Improvement
Staff compared the new information about family well-being to other previously reviewed sources to develop the following goal, objectives, expected outcomes, data for tracking progress, expected challenges, and action plan.

Program Goal
All of Us Together will partner with families and work with community partners to support families' progress toward improved well-being and stronger financial stability. We will pay special attention to the families impacted by the job loss and the changes that these families will experience over the next two to five years as a result of the job loss.

This goal is tied to the Family Well-Being Family Engagement Outcome of the PFCE Framework.

  • Family well-being: Families are safe, healthy, have opportunities for educational advancement and economic mobility, and have access to physical and mental health services, housing and food assistance, and other family support services.

Expected Challenges
Special effort may be required to motivate parents to participate and stay engaged in the job cross-training and apprenticeships. Parent may likewise require support to be ready to fill positions as they become available.


Table 4.6. Example 4 – All of Us Together, Inc., Objectives, Expected Outcomes, and Data, Tools, and Methods (PFCE/Community Job Losses)

Objective and Connection to the PFCE Framework Expected Outcomes Data, Tools, or Methods for Tracking Progress
  1. Develop MOUs with no fewer than five key community partners that have the capacity to offer job cross-training and apprenticeships by the end of year one of the five-year project period.
    • Program impact areas: community partnerships
  • Parents who experience job loss will re-enter the workforce resulting in families being more financially stable.
  • Signed MOU agreements
  • Meeting agendas and minutes
  • Parent interviews and focus groups
  • PIR data on employment
  1. Within one month of the start of the program year and continuing throughout the program year, ensure that 100 percent of parents have information about support services available in the community (including mental health counseling, treatment for substance use, and job training) to better cope with job loss.
    • Program foundation: continuous program improvement
    • Program impact areas: family partnerships, community partnerships
    • Outcomes: family well-being, connection to peers and community, parents as learners, parents in transition, parents as advocates and leaders
  • Families will access community-based support services that provide them with increased stability.
  • Parent meeting attendance, agendas, and minutes
  • Copies of flyers and brochures distributed via parent meetings and through “cubby conversations”
  • Job and health fair promotional material
  • Family pre- and post- satisfaction survey
  • Case management notes
  • Parent interviews and focus groups
  • PIR data on provided or referred community services
  1. Within one month of the start of the program year and continuing throughout the program year, ensure that 100 percent of classroom, family services, and enrollment staff know about resources available in the community to help support families experiencing these stressors.
    • Program impact areas: family partnerships, community partnerships
    • Outcomes: family well-being, connection to peers and community
  • Program staff and community-based organizations will increase their understanding of the needs of families that experience job loss.
  • Staff training sign-in sheets, agendas, and notes
  • Program training calendar
  • Coaching and reflective supervision agendas or outlines
  • Professional development plans and files
  • Community partner surveys
  1. By year two of the five-year project period, deliver training in mental health consultation, reflective practice, and supervision to 100 percent of classroom, family services, and enrollment staff to ensure that staff have a better understanding of how job loss and job transition influence stress and can lead to health issues such as depression and anxiety as well as substance use disorders.
    • Program foundations: professional development
  • Parents who are impacted by mental health issues related to job loss will receive intervention services that will reduce the negative impact of the job loss.
  • Staff training sign-in sheets, agendas, and notes
  • Program training calendar
  • Coaching and reflective supervision agendas or outlines
  • Professional development plans and files
  • Family pre- and post- satisfaction surveys
  • Parent interviews

Table 4.7. Example 4 – All of Us Together Action Plan (PFCE/Community Job Losses)

Action/Strategy Person(s) Responsible Timeline Financial Supports
  1. Facilitate a working group (inclusive
    of community organizations) to create
    a standardized MOU template that
    is specific to job training, including
    apprenticeships.
Head Start
operations
manager
Immediately–one
month
  • Cost of space for meeting
  • Meeting materials
  • Food/coffee
    estimated at $250
  1. Meet with community college, State Department of Labor, and other workforce development entities to obtain signed MOUs.
Head Start
director
Months two to
three and ongoing
thereafter
Travel costs estimated
at $100
  1. Place a resource list on our agency website of support services available in the community. Update no less than quarterly.
Family services
manager and I/T
manager
Months one to
six and ongoing
thereafter
Funds for increased
website capacity
estimated at $1,500
  1. Create a brochure listing support services available in the community.
Management team Month two and
ongoing thereafter
Translation services,
printing estimated at
$5,000
  1. Distribute resources brochure to each
    family applying for services.
Family services staff Month two and
ongoing thereafter
Translation costs $800
  1. Distribute resources brochure to each
    family applying for services.
ERSEA staff Month two and
ongoing thereafter
 
  1. Deliver training in mental health
    consultation, reflective practice, and
    supervision.
Management
team
Annually during
pre-service,
and as part of
new employee
orientation
Trainers, materials,
classroom substitutes,
and training space
rental estimated at
$500
  1. Research funding sources and
    implement a system to support
    short-term financial needs of families
    experiencing job loss.
Head Start
director
Year two and
ongoing thereafter
Costs for meetings,
developing materials,
staff training estimated
at $500

Engaging families and key stakeholders in the goals-setting process supported the implementation of the action plan by ensuring shared responsibility and support throughout the process. As part of ongoing communication with the Regional Office, the program also engaged in regular discussions about the program's progress toward this and other program goals. The program stayed in close contact with its training and technical assistance provider to discuss its ongoing planning and to identify or access training and resources to implement its plan to support family well-being.

Question Mark IconHow will these examples inform your program goals, action plans, and tracking procedures?

While engaging with families and community partners to achieve its goal, the program continues to be intentional about documenting all activities put in place (measure of efforts) and capturing the changes observed and reported by parents (measure of effect) while tracking progress, reviewing steps, making needed improvements, and monitoring progress toward supporting the well-being of families in this time of transition.

Locator Pin for the end of the topic

Topic 4 described how four typical programs integrate goals, expected outcomes, and action plans into their planning process. The first example focused on strengthening children's transitions to kindergarten. The second outlined an initiative that promotes language and literacy development for preschool children. The third used a health-related goal to maximize children's learning opportunities. The fourth explored ways that programs partner with families to make progress toward family well-being. As you read these planning scenarios, did you think about your own program? Of course, the specifics differ, but there are lessons to be learned from someone else's experience.

Foundations for Excellence: A Guide for Five-Year Planning and Continuous Improvement, 2nd Edition, offers us a shared vocabulary and toolbox of strategies that will support your program's strategic planning. Build on these ideas with other stakeholders in your program and your community partners. Through communication and collaboration we benefit from diverse points of view and together we realize our shared mission of building responsive, empowering programs for children and their families.

Topic:Program Planning

Resource Type: Article

National Centers: Program Management and Fiscal Operations

Last Updated: January 30, 2019