Science Preschool

Preschool

Domain: Scientific Reasoning

Sub-Domain: Scientific Inquiry

Goal P-SCI 1. Child observes and describes observable phenomena (objects, materials, organisms, and events).

Developmental Progression   Indicators
36 to 48 Months 48 to 60 Months   By 60 Months
Uses the five senses to observe objects, materials, organisms, and events. Provides simple verbal or signed descriptions. With adult support, represents observable phenomena, such as draws a picture. Makes increasingly complex observations of objects, materials, organisms, and events. Provides greater detail in descriptions. Represents observable phenomena in more complex ways, such as pictures that include more detail.  
  • Identifies the five senses (smell, touch, sight, sound, taste) and uses them to make observations.
  • Uses observational tools to extend the five senses, such as a magnifying glass, microscope, binoculars, or stethoscope.
  • Describes observable phenomena using adjectives and labels, such as lemons taste sour and play dough feels sticky.
  • Represents observable phenomena with pictures, diagrams, and 3-D models.

Goal P-SCI 2. Child engages in scientific talk.

Developmental Progression   Indicators
36 to 48 Months 48 to 60 Months   By 60 Months
Begins to use scientific vocabulary words with modeling and support from an adult. Sometimes repeats new words offered by adults. Uses a greater number of scientific vocabulary words. Repeats new words offered by adults and may ask questions about unfamiliar words.  
  • Uses scientific practice words or signs, such as observe, describe, compare, contrast, question, predict, experiment, reflect, cooperate, or measure.
  • Uses scientific content words when investigating and describing observable phenomena, such as parts of a plant, animal, or object.

Goal P-SCI 3. Child compares and categorizes observable phenomena.

Developmental Progression   Indicators
36 to 48 Months 48 to 60 Months   By 60 Months
Sorts objects into groups based on simple attributes, such as color. With support, uses measurement tools to quantify similarities and differences of observable phenomena, such as when a child scoops sand into two containers and, with adult assistance, determines which container holds more scoops. With increasing independence, sorts objects into groups based on more complex attributes, such as weight, sound, or texture. Uses measurement tools to assess the properties of and compare observable phenomena.  
  • Categorizes by sorting observable phenomena into groups based on attributes such as appearance, weight, function, ability, texture, odor, and sound.
  • Uses measurement tools, such as a ruler, balance scale, eye dropper, unit blocks, thermometer, or measuring cup, to quantify similarities and differences of observable phenomena.
woman and child with magnifying glass looking at plantYoung children learn to use observational tools to extend their senses and to observe the natural world up close.

Sub-Domain: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

Goal P-SCI 4. Child asks a question, gathers information, and makes predictions.

Developmental Progression   Indicators
36 to 48 Months 48 to 60 Months   By 60 Months
Asks simple questions. Uses adults as primary resources to gather information about questions. With adult support and modeling, makes simple predictions, such as "I think that the golf ball will be heavier than the ping pong ball." Asks more complex questions. Uses other sources besides adults to gather information, such as books or other experts. Uses background knowledge and experiences to make predictions.  
  • Asks questions that can be answered through an investigation, such as "What do plants need to grow?" or "What countries do the children in our class come from?"
  • Gathers information about a question by looking at books or discussing prior knowledge and observations.
  • Makes predictions and brainstorms solutions based on background knowledge and experiences, such as "I think that plants need water to grow," or "I think adding yellow paint to purple will make brown."

Goal P-SCI 5. Child plans and conducts investigations and experiments.

Developmental Progression   Indicators
36 to 48 Months 48 to 60 Months   By 60 Months
With adult support, engages in simple investigations and experiments, such as building a "bridge" out of classroom materials and seeing how many dolls it will hold before it collapses. Records data with teacher assistance, mostly using pictures and marks on a page. With increasing independence, engages in some parts of conducting complex investigations or experiments. Increasingly able to articulate the steps that need to be taken to conduct an investigation. Uses more complex ways to gather and record data, such as with adult support, makes a graph that shows children's favorite snacks.  
  • Articulates steps to be taken and lists materials needed for an investigation or experiment.
  • Implements steps and uses materials to explore testable questions, such as "Do plants need water to grow?" by planting seeds and giving water to some but not to others.
  • Uses senses and simple tools to observe, gather, and record data, such as gathering data on where children's families are from and creating a graph that shows the number of children from different countries.

Goal P-SCI 6. Child analyzes results, draws conclusions, and communicates results.

Developmental Progression   Indicators
36 to 48 Months 48 to 60 Months   By 60 Months
With adult assistance, analyzes and interprets data. Draws conclusions and provides simple descriptions of results. For example, an adult suggests counting how many dolls can be supported by a bridge before it breaks and along with the children counts, "One, two, three dolls. What happened when we put on the next doll?" A child says, "The bridge broke!" With increasing independence, analyzes and interprets data and draws conclusions. With adult support, compares results to initial prediction and generates new questions or designs. For example, after putting multiple magnets together to create one magnet that is not strong enough to lift 10 paperclips, builds another and tries again. Communicates results, solutions, and conclusions in increasingly complex ways through multiple methods.  
  • Analyzes and interprets data and summarizes results of investigation.
  • Draws conclusions, constructs explanations, and verbalizes cause and effect relationships.
  • With adult support, compares results to initial prediction and offers evidence as to why they do or do not work. Generates new testable questions based on results.
  • Communicates results, solutions, and conclusions through a variety of methods, such as telling an adult that plants need water to grow or putting dots on a map that show the number of children from each country.
Image removed.With increasing independence, children plan and conduct investigations to gather information and make predictions about how things work.

Topic:School Readiness

Resource Type: Article

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